callosity

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callus

 [kal´us]
1. localized hyperplasia of the horny layer of the epidermis due to pressure or friction.
2. an unorganized network of woven bone formed about the ends of a broken bone; it is absorbed as repair is completed (provisional callus), and ultimately replaced by true bone (definitive callus).
A fracture with callus formation (arrow) is demonstrated corresponding to the base of the second metatarsal. From Thrall and Ziessman, 2001.

cal·los·i·ty

(ka-los'i-tē),
A circumscribed thickening of the keratin layer of the epidermis as a result of repeated friction or intermittent pressure.
Synonym(s): callus (1) , keratoma (1) , poroma (1)
[L. fr. callosus, thick-skinned]

callosity

/cal·los·i·ty/ (kah-los´ĭ-te) a callus (1).

callosity

(kə-lŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. callosi·ties
1. The condition of being calloused. Also called tylosis.
2. Hardheartedness; insensitivity.
3. See callus.

callosity

See callus, def. 1.

callosity

A bony bump

callosity

A bony bump, callus

cal·los·i·ty

(kă-los'i-tē)
A circumscribedthickening of the keratin layer of the epidermis as a result of repeated friction or intermittent pressure.
Synonym(s): callus (1) , keratoma (1) , poroma (1) , tyloma.
[L. fr. callosus, thick-skinned]

callosity

A protective response of the skin to excessive or prolonged friction or pressure, especially over a bony prominence. A common example is the corn on a toe caused by ill-fitting footwear or by an abnormally positioned toe.

callosity

a callus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though declared an internationally protected species in 1935, this stocky whale, notable for its wart-like bumps, or callosities, covering the head, was hunted in Brazilian waters until the close of the last whaling station in Santa Catarina in 1973.
Working with a former Sydney University computer engineering student David Shanahan, Burnell uses a computer-assisted recognition system to quickly match those callosities with his photographic records, a process similar to the one police computers use to match and identify fingerprints.
and encountered numerous ragged excrescences and raspy callosities
The detective then informs the doctor that with his specialized knowledge, he can accurately infer the whole history of a man by observing such things as his fingernails, his facial expression, and the callosities of his forefinger and thumb.
Veterans with minor foot-deformities such as pes planus (flat fleet), hammer toes, severe callosities, or leg-length discrepancies less than 1 1/2" will be eligible for shoe modifications.
2) described callosities on both stylohyoid complexes and those were regarded as ossified attachments of stylohyoid ligaments to corresponding styloid processes.
PC is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by triad of subungual hyperkeratosis with accumulation of hard keratinous material beneath the distal portion of the nails, lifting the nails from the nail bed, keratosis palmaris et plantaris with thick callosities, especially on the soles and thick white areas on the oral mucosa.
To compare foot soaks in plain and soapy water, a prospective cohort study enrolled 15 leprosy patients who had callosities and heel cracks,z Investigators graded the severity of the callosities and cracks clinically and photographically on a 0 to 4 scale (0=no cracks or calluses; 4=deep cracks and thick calluses).
7) In a Turkish study exploring second toe length and forefoot disorders, ballet students with longer second toes had more callosities, more foot pain, and more frequent signs of first metatarsal phalangeal joint inflammation.
Pronotum: 3x as wide as long (30/10), lateral margins roundedly converging anteriorly bearing a pilose fingerlike vertical tubercles; anterior margin concave, collar ringlike, disk with a median carina and punctured oval callosities laterally.
The three species of Helioscirtus listed above share the presence of a couple of callosities on the pronotum, right and left of the median carina and before the transverse sulcus; this character separates them from such middle-eastern species as H.
18) These deformities can result in painful bunions and callosities.