callosity

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callus

 [kal´us]
1. localized hyperplasia of the horny layer of the epidermis due to pressure or friction.
2. an unorganized network of woven bone formed about the ends of a broken bone; it is absorbed as repair is completed (provisional callus), and ultimately replaced by true bone (definitive callus).
A fracture with callus formation (arrow) is demonstrated corresponding to the base of the second metatarsal. From Thrall and Ziessman, 2001.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cal·los·i·ty

(ka-los'i-tē),
A circumscribed thickening of the keratin layer of the epidermis as a result of repeated friction or intermittent pressure.
Synonym(s): callus (1) , keratoma (1) , poroma (1)
[L. fr. callosus, thick-skinned]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

callosity

(kə-lŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. callosi·ties
1. The condition of being calloused. Also called tylosis.
2. Hardheartedness; insensitivity.
3. See callus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

callosity

A bony bump
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

callosity

A bony bump, callus
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cal·los·i·ty

(kă-los'i-tē)
A circumscribedthickening of the keratin layer of the epidermis as a result of repeated friction or intermittent pressure.
Synonym(s): callus (1) , keratoma (1) , poroma (1) , tyloma.
[L. fr. callosus, thick-skinned]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

callosity

A protective response of the skin to excessive or prolonged friction or pressure, especially over a bony prominence. A common example is the corn on a toe caused by ill-fitting footwear or by an abnormally positioned toe.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(2000) Preliminary investigation of debridement of plantar callosities in rheumatoid arthritis.
They are indigenous to Africa, Asia, and extreme southern Europe (introduced to Gibraltar) and some possess ischial callosities for sitting.
(39) The most famous expression of the markings that a man's occupation leaves on his body is found in A Study in Scarlet: "By a man's finger-nails, by his coat-sleeve, by his boot, by his trouser knees, by the callosities of his forefinger and thumb, by his expression, by his shirt cuffs--by each of these things a man's calling is plainly revealed" (Doyle 1986, 15).
Aperture wider than higher, diagonal, without callosities in the parietal union; peristoma sharp, keel-like resembling a siphostoma.
Conditions such as hammertoe of the second toe, metatarsalgia of the lesser MTP joints, plantar surface keratoses, and callosities can be present.
They and other whale research pioneers began to distinguish individuals by using distinctive, black horny protuberances, called callosities, on the whales' heads.
A horrible bogey-ridden, demon-haunted time it was to me and then one has not the fortitude, or callosities perhaps, with which to deal with it.
Though declared an internationally protected species in 1935, this stocky whale, notable for its wart-like bumps, or callosities, covering the head, was hunted in Brazilian waters until the close of the last whaling station in Santa Catarina in 1973.
Working with a former Sydney University computer engineering student David Shanahan, Burnell uses a computer-assisted recognition system to quickly match those callosities with his photographic records, a process similar to the one police computers use to match and identify fingerprints.
and encountered numerous ragged excrescences and raspy callosities
The detective then informs the doctor that with his specialized knowledge, he can accurately infer the whole history of a man by observing such things as his fingernails, his facial expression, and the callosities of his forefinger and thumb.