call light


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A bedside button tethered to the wall in a patient’s room, which directs signals the nursing station; a call light usually indicates that the patient has a need or perceived need requiring attention from the nurse on duty

call light

A device used by a patient to signal his or her need for assistance from professional staff. It typically consists of a wireless remote control at the bedside, linked to a beeper, buzzer, cellular phone, chime, or light panel.
See also: light
References in periodicals archive ?
Another study (Tzeng, 2010) addressed RN perspectives of the nature of patient-initiated call light response time.
Additional steps were required to answer call light requests, with additional trips needed to provide the care requested.
I know this now that I have been on both sides of that call light.
Both the nurse call light tracking and patient movement systems contain digital time-stamped data.
Have you been asked to push the 64.5% (20) 3.2% (1) call light when getting out of bed?
(2006) Effects of nursing rounds on patients' call light use, satisfaction and safety.
In a call light study over a 6-week period, a decrease was noted in call lights from 13,216 in the 2-week period prior to initiating hourly rounding, to 9,316 in the 2 weeks after hourly rounding was initiated (Meade, Bursell, & Kelelsen, 2006).
The CNS convened a team to identify interventions to improve patient fall rates, call light usage, and patient satisfaction scores.
Doe's history of falls, the staff had already met to review and discuss a plan of care; this included taking her to the bathroom prior to bedtime, performing frequent rounds, ensuring the call light button was within her reach and placing her in a room closer to the nursing station for better observation.
Control charts are a method of monitoring data on selected attributes or quality indicators (e.g., falls, call light usage, medication areas, infection rates) over time.
Factors contributing to a patient's overall satisfaction with inpatient hospital care include measures, such as commode assistance, call light placement, and telephone placement (Kerfoot, 2008; Meade et al., 2006).
A common understanding is that if a nurse responds to a call light more quickly, the patient may be less likely to fall.