calendar method


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calendar method

 [kal´en-der]
a type of natural family planning; see contraception.

calendar method

A contraceptive idea based on the fact that ovulation occurs 14 days before the onset of the next menstrual period, and on the unreliable assumption that the length of future menstrual periods can be predicted on the basis of previous cycles. See also CONTRACEPTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The DHS already takes steps to minimize this by asking respondents in an early part of the questionnaire whether they have heard of a number of different methods, including the rhythm method, which should help to establish calendar methods as being part of the range of methods of interest; however, the DHS does not currently account for periodic contraception.
Strong correlations were found between age and education level and the use of the calendar method at last intercourse: Women in the two older age-groups were more likely than the youngest women to have used this method (2.4 and 3.9, respectively), and those with the two highest education levels were more likely than those with the least education to have done so (4.6-4.7).
However, greater education was associated with less method nonuse and more use of the calendar method. Furthermore, our finding that women in the middle income level showed an increased likelihood of using the pill may reflect that these women can afford to buy these contraceptives, which have to be paid for out of pocket.
AThe calendar method involves abstaining from sex during a woman's fertile period.
Clinical trials suggest it's 94 per cent effective, which makes it better than the calendar method. But be warned - about 1 in 17 women who use it will fall pregnant in any one year!
Some men wanted to avoid pregnancy in relationships they knew were not serious and took the initiative to use condoms, withdrawal or the calendar method. One man explained:
For example, one 36-year-old married woman with two children and high education chose not to use a modern method because of weight gain on the pill and a reluctance to "put foreign things in my body." Instead, she opted for the calendar method, and although she considered that it "worked well," she reported having two unintended pregnancies; on both occasions, she used abortion for birthspacing.
When they decided not to have any more children, they opted for the calendar method because of concerns about the harmful effects the injectable could have on her body.
The calendar method eventually failed her and she had her fourth child.
Some men assisted women's use of the calendar method to ensure that safe periods were properly observed.
This clear preference for traditional methods has been described in a study from Cameroon, (34) which points out that women who use the calendar method do not have an unmet need, nor are they less motivated to avoid pregnancy or less aware of modern contraception.
2011) have compared real-time and calendar methods to assess drinking outcomes.