calcareous infiltration

(redirected from calcium infiltration)

infiltration

 [in″fil-tra´shun]
1. the pathological accumulation in tissue or cells of substances not normal to them or in amounts in excess of the normal.
2. infiltrate (def. 2).
3. the deposition of a solution directly into tissue; see infiltration anesthesia.
adipose infiltration fatty infiltration.
calcareous infiltration deposit of lime and magnesium salts in the tissues.
cellular infiltration the migration and accumulation of cells within the tissues.
fatty infiltration
1. a deposit of fat in tissues, especially between cells.
2. the presence of fat vacuoles in the cell cytoplasm.
intravenous infiltration
1. the movement of a needle or cannula from within a vessel into the surrounding tissue. The typical symptoms are a slowed flow of fluids, swelling, pallor, coolness of the skin, and discomfort in the area; severity of the symptoms will depend on the amount and type of fluid infused.
2. inadvertent administration of parenteral fluid into the tissues.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn),
1. Deposition of lime or other insoluble calcium salts.
2. A process in which tissue or noncellular material in the body becomes hardened as the result of precipitates or larger deposits of insoluble salts of calcium (and also magnesium), especially calcium carbonate and phosphate (hydroxyapatite) normally occurring only in the formation of bone and teeth.
3. A dense opacity (less dense than metal, however) on a radiographic image.
[L. calx, lime, + facio, to make]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

calcareous infiltration

(1) Dystrophic calcification. 
(2) Calcification.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. Deposition of lime or other insoluble calcium salts.
2. A process in which tissue or noncellular material in the body becomes hardened as the result of precipitates or larger deposits of insoluble salts of calcium (and also magnesium), especially calcium carbonate and phosphate (hydroxyapatite), normally occurring only in the formation of bone and teeth.
Synonym(s): calcareous infiltration.
[L. calx, lime, + facio, to make]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1999, we published a report on the importance of consuming high-dose vitamin K to block calcium infiltration into our soft tissues.