calciphylaxis


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calciphylaxis

 [kal″sĭ-fĭ-lak´sis]
a condition of induced hypersensitivity characterized by formation of calcified tissue in response to administration of a challenging agent.

cal·ci·phy·lax·is

(kal'si-fī-lak'sis),
A condition of induced systemic hypersensitivity in which tissues respond to appropriate challenging agents with a sudden, but sometimes evanescent, local calcification. Clinical findings include painful, ischemic tissue necrosis with a black eschar on a red to purple reticulated background. Serum calcium-phosphorus product is elevated; secondary hyperparathyroidism is frequently seen. X-rays show calcification of blood vesels in the involved areas.

calciphylaxis

/cal·ci·phy·lax·is/ (kal″sĭ-fĭ-lak´sis) a condition of induced hypersensitivity characterized by formation of calcified tissue in response to administration of a challenging agent.

calciphylaxis

A condition characterised by calcification of the media of muscular arteries, deep tissues and skin in patients with chronic renal failure, which is often accompanied by intimal hyperplasia, thrombosis and necrotising skin ulcers and secondary hyperparathyroidism.

cal·ci·phy·lax·is

(kal'si-fī-lak'sis)
A condition of induced systemic hypersensitivity in which tissues respond to appropriate challenging agents with a sudden, but sometimes evanescent, local calcification.

calciphylaxis

the formation of calcified tissue in response to administration of a challenging agent after induction of a hypersensitive state.
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The Phase II clinical trial was an open label, single arm, repeat dose study which assessed the effect of 12 weeks of treatment with SNF472 on wound healing in Calciphylaxis patients receiving dialysis.
Calciphylaxis is a rare condition that is characterised by vascular calcification and thrombosis, which leads to necrosis (cellular death) of the skin and fatty tissues and causes patients to experience painful skin ulcers.
Calciphylaxis shows as a fine netlike pattern of calcification, a finding that Dr.
Bryant and White defined calciphylaxis (calcific uraemic arteriopathy) for the first time in 1898.
The most influential factors in the development of calciphylaxis are alterations in metabolism, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, low serum albumin and taking anticoagulants.
Calciphylaxis in patients on hemodialysis: a prevalence study.
Soft-tissue calcifications may be classified into metastatic (abnormal serum calcium-phosphorus levels), tumoral (elevated phosphorus but normal calcium levels), dystrophic including calcinosis (normal serum calcium-phosphorus levels but damaged tissue), idiopathic (no abnormalities detected) and calciphylaxis (chronic renal failure with abnormal calcium-phosphorus levels).
Rapid improvement of calciphylaxis after intravenous pamidronato therapy in a patient with chronic renal failure.
The first clinical differential diagnoses were cutaneous SLE, nephrogenous dermatopathy, calciphylaxis, and calcinosis.
Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) is the preferred and more descriptive term for what was pre viously known as calciphylaxis.
Calciphylaxis is a rare disorder in patients with chronic renal failure that is characterized by ischemic necrotic skin lesions.