calcify

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Related to calcifying: Calcifying odontogenic cyst

cal·ci·fy

(kal'si-fī),
To deposit or lay down calcium salts, as in the formation of bone.

cal·ci·fy

(kal'si-fī)
To deposit or lay down calcium salts, as in the formation of bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Again, the algae appear to have had a crucial impact: Calcifying plankton have a higher sinking velocity which allows them to reach greater depths before they are eventually eaten by other organisms consuming oxygen.
However the possible cause is inflammatory reaction of tissue injury.2 Though the pseudotumour is accepted as a benign entity with fibroblastic proliferation which may mimic malignancy due to its occasional aggressive nature, a portion of these pseudtomours may represent actual neoplasia.1 We report a rare case of calcifying inflammatory pseudotumour of maxilla mimicking a malignancy.
According to the current classification of odontogenic tumors by the WHO, this lesion, which was previously known as calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, has now returned to be considered a cystic lesion [4].
Taylor, "Calcifying acne lesions," International Journal of Dermatology, vol.
So even if acidification continues, the phytoplankton could quickly restart calcifying if conditions improved.
Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour: biological profile based on 181 cases from the literature.
Calcifying fibrous tumor is uniformly negative for ALK-1 and has never been shown to have recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities.
Pindborg tumor (calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor [CEOT]) is named for the Danish pathologist Jens J.
Pilomatricoma: A dermal analog of calcifying odontogenic cyst Indian Journal of Dental Research: 2008;19(3) : 261-263.
The new study reassures people who take calcium at levels within the recommended guidelines for bone health that they can continue to do so safely, without worrying about the risk of calcifying their arteries, according to Samelson.
The increased acidity in the seawater is felt throughout the marine food web as calcifying organisms, such as corals, oysters and sea urchins, find it more difficult to build their shells and skeletons making them more susceptible to predation and damage.Recent studies, such as this one conducted by Albright and colleagues, are beginning to reveal how ocean acidification affects non-calcifying stages of marine organisms, such as reproduction."Reproductive failure of young coral species is an increasing concern since reefs are already highly stressed from bleaching, hurricanes, disease and poor water quality," said Chris Langdon, associate professor at the Rosenstiel School and co-author of the study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.