calcification


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Related to calcification: dystrophic calcification

calcification

 [kal″sĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
the deposit of calcium salts, mostly calcium phosphate, in body tissues. The normal absorption of calcium is facilitated by parathyroid hormone and by vitamin D. When there are increased amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood (as in hyperparathyroidism), there is deposition of calcium in the alveoli of the lungs, the renal tubules, the thyroid gland, the gastric mucosa, and the arterial walls. Normally calcium is deposited in the bone matrix to insure stability and strength of the bone and in growing teeth.
dystrophic calcification the deposition of calcium in abnormal tissue, such as scar tissue or atherosclerotic plaques, without abnormalities of blood calcium.
eggshell calcification deposition of a thin layer of calcium around a thoracic lymph node, often seen in silicosis.

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn),
1. Deposition of lime or other insoluble calcium salts.
2. A process in which tissue or noncellular material in the body becomes hardened as the result of precipitates or larger deposits of insoluble salts of calcium (and also magnesium), especially calcium carbonate and phosphate (hydroxyapatite) normally occurring only in the formation of bone and teeth.
3. A dense opacity (less dense than metal, however) on a radiographic image.
[L. calx, lime, + facio, to make]

calcification

(kăl′sə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1.
a. Impregnation with calcium or calcium salts, as with calcium carbonate.
b. Hardening, as of tissue, by such impregnation.
2. A calcified substance or part.

calcification

The deposition of calcium in tissues; the term mineralisation is often used for physiologic calcification.

calcification

Medtalk The deposition of calcium in tissues

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. Deposition of lime or other insoluble calcium salts.
2. A process in which tissue or noncellular material in the body becomes hardened as the result of precipitates or larger deposits of insoluble salts of calcium (and also magnesium), especially calcium carbonate and phosphate (hydroxyapatite), normally occurring only in the formation of bone and teeth.
Synonym(s): calcareous infiltration.
[L. calx, lime, + facio, to make]

calcification

Deposition of calcium salts, usually calcium hydroxyapatite crystals, in body tissues, especially when there has been prolonged inflammation or injury. Calcification is normal in bones and teeth.

cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. Deposition of lime or other insoluble calcium salts.
2. Process in which tissue or noncellular material in the body hardens due to precipitates or larger deposits of insoluble salts of calcium, especially calcium carbonate and phosphate normally occurring only in the formation of bone and teeth.
[L. calx, lime, + facio, to make]

Patient discussion about calcification

Q. Please let me know what is breast calcification? My mom aged 52 years is diagnosed with breast cancer and is suffering for the past 5 years. I am scared too as I know that possibility of breast cancer is also linked genetically. The mammogram report shows some white spots on mammogram. But it has been recorded as breast calcifications. Doctor advised me not to worry as this has got no relevance to breast cancer. Please let me know what is breast calcification?

A. These are tiny calcium deposits in the breast tissue. You can not touch or feel breast calcifications. To know about them the only way is by mammogram. They are usually not cancerous but in some forms like tight clusters with irregular shapes can indicate breast cancer. There are two main types: microcalfications and macrocalfications. But if your doctor says that they pose no threat then I am sure you have nothing to worry about. Just follow his advices.

More discussions about calcification
References in periodicals archive ?
Given that bone marrow vessels also undergo calcification, but most of the research literature on vascular calcification describes that which occurs outside the skeleton, the team decided to investigate further.
Calcification within lung cancer occurs by the following mechanisms: (A) calcified scars or granuloma engulfed by a tumor, (B) dystrophic calcification in the necrotic parts of tumor, and (C) calcium deposition by the secretory function of carcinoma itself (e.g., mucinous adenocarcinoma) as in our case (1, 9).
Previous studies have reported that symptomatic patients have more calcification than found in asymptomatic patients.[7] However, we found that the symptoms of movement disorder but not the appearance of psychiatric signs were related to the VBGC after we regrouped the patients according to specific clinical symptoms.
"The hippocampus is made up of different layers, and it is possible that the calcifications did not damage the hippocampal structure that is important for memory storage," de Brouwer suggested.
Inozyme Pharma is a committed to developing novel medicines for the treatment of rare metabolic diseases of calcification. The company was founded in 2016 with technology licensed from Yale University.
Role of Systemic and Local Inflammation in Vascular Calcification
Calcification is also seen in the SVG as a result of atherosclerosis, being reportedly found in 40% of patients undergoing SVG PCI according to IVUS findings [7].
In this study, we used a modified animal model of vascular calcification in the context of DN by administering a high-fat diet and injection of streptozotocin (STZ), followed by intragastric administration of nicotine and intramuscular injection of vitamin D3.
Cells were cultured in calcification medium (DMEM+10mmol/L beta-glycerine phosphate + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 15 days and the medium were replaced every other days.
In 2007, an animal study demonstrated significant reduction of arterial calcification in response to vitamin K supplementation.
It also provides new targets for potential therapies to prevent or treat atherosclerotic vascular calcification and arterial stiffness.