calcific tendonitis

calcific tendinitis

Inflammation of a tendon accompanied by focal calcium deposits, especially common in the supraspinatus tendon of shoulder joint.

Clinical findings
Pain, decreased range of motion.

Management
Diet—calcium restriction, magnesium supplementation; extracorporeal shock wave therapy; analgesics/NSAIDs; physical therapy—electroanalgesia, ice therapy, heat; ultrasound (uncertain efficacy), iontophoresis (uncertain efficacy), injections, needling and lavage (75% response rate); corticosteroid injections (useful if shoulder is acutely inflamed); removal of deposits by open or arthroscopic procedures yields a 90% response rate.

calcific tendonitis

Orthopedics Inflammation of a tendon accompanied by focal calcium deposits, common in the supraspinatus tendon of shoulder joint Clinical Pain, ↓ ROM Management NSAIDs, needle aspiration, surgery, pulse ultrasound. See Tendinitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute longus colli calcific tendonitis causing neck pain and dysphagia.
1) Calcific tendonitis is a condition that causes the formation of a small usually about 1-2cm size calcium deposits (Hydroxyapatite) within the tendon of rotator cuff.
A severe sore throat in a middle-aged man: Calcific tendonitis of the longus colli tendon.
Calcified tendinopathy or calcific tendonitis (CT) is a chronic condition where deposits of calcium phosphate crystals accumulate in the midsubstance of the tendon fibers.
Correlations among mineral components, progressive calcification process and clinical symptoms of calcific tendonitis.
Given the clinical symptoms, physical examination and specific imaging findings, the diagnosis of acute calcific tendonitis of the longus colli was established.
An ultrasound-directed nonsurgical needling technique reduced pain and improved mobility in 95% of adults with calcific tendonitis.
Calcific tendonitis, which is most common in adults aged 30-40 years, occurs when small calcium deposits form inside the tendons of the rotator cuff.
An ultrasound-directed nonrgical needling techique reduced pain and improved mobility in 95% of adults with calcific tendonitis of the shoulder.
Calcific tendonitis, which is most common in adults aged 3040 years, occurs when small calcium deposits form inside the tendons of the rotator cuff.
Plain X-rays are typically unrevealing, but could be used to rule out other reasons for pain, such as calcific tendonitis.
CONCLUSIONS The Philadelphia Panel guidelines recommend continued normal activity for acute, uncomplicated low back pain and therapeutic exercise for chronic, subacute, and postsurgical low back pain; transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and exercise for knee osteoarthritis; proprioceptive and therapeutic exercise for chronic neck pain; and the use of therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of calcific tendonitis of the shoulder.