calamus


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cal·a·mus

(kal'ă-mŭs),
1. The dried, unpeeled rhizome of Acorus calamus (family Araceae), cultivated in Myanmar (Burma) and Sri Lanka, a carminative and anthelmintic.
2. A reed-shaped structure.
[L. reed, a pen]

calamus

(kăl′ə-məs)
n. pl. cala·mi (-mī′)
1.
b. The aromatic rhizome of the sweet flag, used for medicinal purposes and yielding an oil used in perfumery.
2. Any of various chiefly tropical Asian climbing palms of the genus Calamus, having strong flexible stems used as a source of rattan.
3. See quill.

sweet flag

A perennial herb, the rhizone of which contains mucilage, sesquiterpenes and volatile oils (azulene, camphor, cineole, eugenol, pinene and others); it is carminative, spasmolytic and mildly sedative.

Chinese medicine
In traditional Chinese medicine, sweet flag has been used for deafness, seizures and vertigo.

Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, sweet flag has been used for fever, gastrointestinal complaints (dyspepsia and flatulence), menstrual disorders, toothache and tobacco addiction.
 
Toxicity
Aserone, one of sweet flag’s volatile oils, is carcinogenic; the FDA has classified sweet flag as “unsafe”.

cal·a·mus

(kal'ă-mŭs)
A reed-shaped structure.
[L. reed, a pen]

calamus

  1. the quill of a feather.
  2. any hollow, nodeless stem.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the preparation of homogenate or sample 100 adult beetles of same size and age of Callosobruchus analis were treated with LC50of four under test compounds i.e., Cypermethrin (2.2 ug/cm2), Nimolicine (19 ug/cm2), Acorus calamus (5.1 ug/cm2) and Methamidophos (16 ug/cm2).
In palms, false vivipary occurs on both erect (Socratea), climbing (Calamus) and acaulescent (Salacca) stems and is successful in all of these habits (Fisher & Mogea, 1980; Dransfield, 1992; Dransfield, 1997; Baker et al., 2000; Pintaud & Millan, 2004; Rupert et al., 2012).
Whereas among plant matters, the dry weight Micrommelum pubescens was highest (12.6%), followed by Spondis axillaris (12.2%), Alangium chinense (10.2%), Calamus sp.
In the first poem of the "Calamus" cluster, Whitman invokes both a familiar and unconventional pastoral landscape, familiar in its masculinist mythologizing of man's domination over nature, but unconventional in its queer attachments and its emphasis on sociality over individualism:
High values of [F.sub.IC] were obtained for toothache and heart disease (0.88 and 0.83, resp.), showing that locals had reached good agreement on the plant species (Polygonatum odoratum, Valeriana officinalis, Acorus calamus, and Asarum sieboldii) to be used for these ailments.
calamus can probably be ascribed to the content of the more digestible root storage carbohydrates as inulin (SchA1/4tz et al.
Yet the current climate at places Like Calamus is drought-like, with low water levels and crops thirsty for moisture.
calamus is a native of central Asia and eastern Europe, and is indigenous to the marshes of the mountains of India (Gupta 1964).
Fresh rhizome of Acorus calamus was collected from marshy areas of Kunigal in Karnataka, India in 2012.
The second step is to use an awl to punch a small hole in the feather quill (calamus) where the bottom of the quilled strip will be attached.
Determined to find as many old family heirlooms as I could, I discovered that Glenn and Linda at the Sandhill Preservation Center in Calamus, Iowa, had quite a collection of Oscar H.
In tale mescidanza, prefiguratrice sul piano pratico di una "deriva fusionale" dai toni benjaminiani, il calamus si configura come <<strumento di pura e inviolata fedelta>> (p.