cafeteria diet

cafeteria diet

An experimental system for studying obesity that allows rats free, “cafeteria-style” access to cookies, candy, cake (”junk-food”).
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One of the ways of inducing obesity in animals--particularly in rodents--is the cafeteria diet, also known as the Western diet.
In the literature, it is possible to find various protocols for the cafeteria diet for inducing obesity in rodents (Rosini, Silva and De Moraes, 2012).
This does not correlate with the results of study conducted by Pooja et al, who developed cafeteria diet induced obese rat model by administering cafeteria diet for 14 weeks and found significant increase in Lee index.
In experimental animals, cafeteria diet (CAF)-induced obesity closely resembles the human obesity that is induced by overfeeding with high-energy food (SAMPEY et al.
The cafeteria diet consisted of sliced white bread (Karavaj, Russia), crushed chocolate (N.
The objective of this work was to evaluate the morphological characteristics of salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, sublingual) as observed in rats subjected to aerobic physical training and cafeteria diet after weaning.
In rats fed ascorbic acid, vitamin C "was able to protect against high-fat-diet effects, reducing the increase of body weight, total body fat, and enlargement of different adipose deposits induced by the cafeteria diet," the researchers concluded.
The younger students never noticed the fat calorie percentage in their cafeteria diet shrinking from 38 percent to 28 percent over the past school year.
The cafeteria diet induced an average weight difference of 32 g and an overall increase in body weight in the experimental groups occurred at a
The lean rats were fed rat chow and the obese rats were fed on a cafeteria diet as described by Mnonopi et al.