caesarean


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caesarean

(sĭ-zâr′ē-ən)
adj. & n.
Variant of cesarean.

cesarean

, Cesarean, caesarean, Caesarean, caesarian, Caesarian, cesarian, Cesarian (si-zar′ē-ăn, -zer′) [Fr the legend that such an operation was performed for the birth of Julius Caesar]
1. Pert. to a cesarean section.
2. A cesarean section. Cesarean is the most common spelling variant in the U.S. Both the capitalized and uncapitalized forms are acceptable. Writers should be consistent with whatever form they prefer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shennan added that the problems that could affect brain function such as a poorly functioning placenta necessitates caesarean procedure, therefore it is impossible thatA the caesarean delivery causesA autism.
The caesarean section rate is increasing worldwide as there are numerous factors which contribute to decrease in vaginal birth after caesarean section and although repeat caesarean sections are associated with serious morbidity there are only a few studies which assess the risk of placenta praevia and accreta in repeat caesarean section.
Here, Clare debunks seven of the most common caesarean myths: 1 MYTH: Caesarean birth is 'birth gone wrong' REALITY: Awareness campaigns have recently tried to increase understanding about how women's bodies work in pregnancy and birth, and on helping birth unfold as straightforwardly as possible, says Clare.
Use of clinical guidelines, audits of caesarean sections, and timely feedback to health professionals about caesarean section practices.
Primary emergency caesarean section (Em-CS) is a performance indicator of our unit because this group not only determines the future obstetric course of a woman but has a major impact on institutional statistics of CS.
"Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes after Implementation of a Hospital Policy to Limit Low-Risk Planned Caesarean Deliveries before 39 Weeks of Gestation: An Interrupted Time-Series Analysis." BJOG 122 (9): 1200-6.
MAP in association with placenta previa and previous caesarean section is a condition of increasing clinical significance because of rising caesarean section rates worldwide4,5.
Conclusion: Obesity, gestational age, educational and economic status are risk factors for surgical site infections; more so following emergency vs elective caesarean sections.
WHO conducted two studies: a systematic review of available studies that had sought to find the ideal caesarean rate within a given country or population, and a worldwide country-level analysis usingthe latest available data.
One hundred women were included who had previous one caesarean section and were now in their pregnancy with single fetus at term.
Avoids further cesarean and hence risks associated with multiple cesareans, like placenta previa, accreta, adhesions between organs, trauma to bowel/bladder and need for caesarean hysterectomy.
The odds of being overweight or obese are 26 per cent higher for adults born by caesarean section than those born by vaginal delivery, the study found.