Apoda

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Related to caecilian: armadillo

Apoda

or

Gymnophiona

an order of worm-like, burrowing amphibians (caecilians) that lack limb girdles and limbs. They possess small functionless eyes and are found in SE Asia, India, Africa and Central America.
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The selective pressures surrounding burrowing are expressed in the morphological features of burrowing animals, as in the stout forearms of moles and armadillos and in the heavily reinforced skull of caecilians and dibamids (Kleinteich et al.
Liem, 1980)), and caecilians (Summers and Wake, 2005; Measey and Herrel, 2006).
The falcon Leucopternis princeps frequently hunts individuals of the caecilian Caecilia orientalis (48.
Detailed descriptions of larval and adult jaw anatomy are available for salamanders (Kleinteich and Haas, 2007; Ziermann and Diogo, 2013), caecilians (Kleinteich et al.
2004) indicated that the collecting ducts are not ciliated in one species of caecilian.
They did post the July birth of a Caecilian, a legless amphibian, at the Tennessee Aquarium.
According to Joncas, an exclusive diet of praise-and-worship music at Catholic liturgy would be "as undesirable as an exclusive diet of strophic hymnody alone, or folk-pop compositions, or Renaissance motets, or Caecilian Mass parts.
Highlights include the last Panamanian golden frog waving in the wild; a rattlesnake hunting; the caecilian, a worm-like amphibian, allowing her young to feast on her skin, and a mating orgy of sea turtles involving six rivals attacking a mating pair.
The blind, worm-like amphibian called the caecilian takes parenting sacrifices to new levels by letting its babies feed from its flesh.
One factor that made for the accelerated decline and disappearance of small workshops and the rise of factory firms was the transformation of the musical aesthetic ideal of the organ associated with the rapid implementation of what was known as the Caecilian reform of church music.
Constantine's attempts to bring closure to the North African division surrounding the case of Caecilian by referring it to Bishop Miltiades of Rome nicely illustrates the new pact between Church and Empire to negotiate disputes that emerged in the fourth century (pp.
This servant, named Majorinus, was trained, funded and supported by Lucilla and defeated Caecilian in the election.