CDH11

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CDH11

A gene on chromosome 16q21 that encodes a calcium-dependent cell–cell adhesion glycoprotein (cadherin), which is involved in regulating cell–cell adhesions, mobility and proliferation of epithelial cells. CDH11 is a so-called type-II (atypical) cadherin—which lacks a HAV cell adhesion recognition sequence specific to type-I cadherins—and is expressed in osteoblastic cell lines. It is upregulated during differentiation, suggesting a role during in bone development and maintenance.

Molecular pathology
Defects in CDH11 commonly occur in aneurysmal bone cysts and consist of a translocation t(16;17)(q22;p13) with USP6.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cadherin-11 promotes the metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone.
Epigenetic disruption of cadherin-11 in human cancer metastasis.
Adheron has developed a new technology that disrupts immune cell adhesion through Cadherin-11, a cell surface protein, to develop potential treatments for various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.
Adheron has developed a technology that disrupts immune cell adhesion through a cell surface protein called Cadherin-11 so as to develop potential treatments for a range of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and fibrotic diseases.
This deal brings together Adheron's deep understanding of the underlying science of Cadherin-11 with Roche's vast experience in researching and developing next generation medicines.
Loss of cadherin-11 adhesion receptor enhances plastic changes in hippocampal synapses and modifies behavioral responses.
Future analysis of expression of other cadherin molecules, including vascular-endothelial cadherin and mesodermally expressed cadherin-11, in this group of neoplasms may reveal additional useful diagnostic information.
Cadherin-11 is a protein that has been identified as a candidate cell-adhesion molecule required for bone metastasis.
Adheron Therapeutics has created a pioneering technology that disrupts immune cell adhesion via a cell surface protein called Cadherin-11 in order to develop potential treatments for a range of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and fibrotic diseases.
Projects ongoing in his laboratory include studies of the regulation of beta-catenin signaling emphasizing the development of novel technologies with which to regulate it; the interaction between beta-catenin and steroid receptor pathways; cross regulation of beta-catenin and cytokine signaling pathways; the characterization and regulation of cadherin-11 in breast cancer; the identification and characterization of a new APC-like gene, a candidate tumor suppressor in sporadic breast and ovarian cancer; vascular and ostetoblast mimicry in breast cancer; beta-catenin regulation of protein translation; and regulation of beta-catenin signaling by mechanical strain.