cadaverine


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Related to cadaverine: putrescine

cadaverine

 [kah-dav´er-in]
a relatively nontoxic ptomaine, C5H14N2, formed by decarboxylation of lysine; it is sometimes one of the products of Vibrio proteus and of V. cholerae, and occasionally found in the urine in cystinuria, where it causes an unpleasant odor.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ca·dav·er·ine

(kă-dav'er-in),
1,5-pentanediamine; 1,5-diaminopentane; a foul-smelling diamine formed by bacterial decarboxylation of lysine; poisonous and irritating to the skin; found in decaying meat and fish.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cadaverine

(kə-dăv′ə-rēn′)
n.
A syrupy, colorless, foul-smelling polyamine, C5H14N2, produced in decaying animal tissue by the decarboxylation of lysine.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ca·dav·er·ine

(kă-dav'ĕr-in)
A foul-smelling diamine formed by bacterial decarboxylation of lysine; poisonous and irritating to the skin.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cadaverine

An AMINE found in decomposing body tissue.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ca·dav·er·ine

(kă-dav'ĕr-in)
A foul-smelling diamine formed by bacterial decarboxylation of lysine; poisonous and irritating to the skin.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
An extracellular cadaverine compound represses lysine decarboxylase.
Julia Arcos-Martinez, "Simultaneous determination of cadaverine and putrescine using a disposable monoamine oxidase based biosensor," Talanta, vol.
While, Put and cadaverine (1,5-diaminopentane) (Cad) are positively charged aliphatic amines and found in living species [5].
Often, when food begins to rot, the smell that we find repulsive comes from the compound cadaverine. It is a foul-smelling diamine compound produced by the putrefaction of animal tissue.
No producer wants putrescine or cadaverine in its wines, and consumers who are sensitive to histamine or tyramine don't want them, either.
1,5-Pentanediamine (PDA), also known as cadaverine, is the decarboxylation product of lysine in vivo.
Wines samples collected during malolactic fermentation were chemically analyzed for: a) Biogenic amines quantification (histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine and phenylethylamine) from samples collected during malolactic fermentation.
The increase in pH could be associated with the formation of volatile compounds, such as ammonia and amines (histamine, putrescine, cadaverine, and tyramine), produced in autolytic pathways, as well as by bacterial action on free amino acids [11].
Eight biogenic amines were investigated on wines, according to standards of putrescine (PUT) dihydrochloride, spermidine (SPD) trihydrochloride, spermine (SPM) tetrahydrochloride, agmatine (AGM) sulfate, cadaverine (CAD) dihydrochloride, serotonine (SRT) hydrochloride, histamine (HIM) dihydrochloride, tyramine (TYM), tryptamine (TRM) and 2-phenylethylamine (PHM) dihydrochloride purchased from Sigma Chemical Co.
Louis, USA), 0.5 mL sample, and 0.1 mL substrate solution (175 [micro]g of cadaverine dihydrochloride) (Sigma-Aldrich, St.