cachexia

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cachexia

 [kah-kek´se-ah]
a profound and marked state of constitutional disorder; general ill health and malnutrition. adj. adj cachec´tic.
cachexia hypophysiopri´va symptoms resulting from total loss of pituitary function, including loss of sexual function, bradycardia, hypothermia, apathy, and coma.
malarial cachexia the physical signs resulting from antecedent attacks of severe malaria, including anemia, sallow skin, yellow sclera, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, and, in children, retardation of growth and puberty.
pituitary cachexia simmonds' disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ca·chex·i·a

(kă-kek'sē-ă),
A general weight loss and wasting occurring in the course of a chronic disease or emotional disturbance.
[G. kakos, bad, + hexis, condition of body]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cachexia

(kə-kĕk′sē-ə)
n.
Weight loss, wasting of muscle, loss of appetite, and general debility that can occur during a chronic disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cachexia

A state of severe weight loss and tissue wasting seconday to underlying disease—e.g., AIDS, terminal cancer, congestive heart failure, COPD, multiple sclerosis, anorexia nervosa, malnutrition, congestive heart failure, tuberculosis, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, mercury poisoning and hormone deficiency.

Clinical findings
Weight loss, muscle atrophy, fatigue, weakness and anorexia.
 
Mechanism
Cachexia is attributed to an interplay of TNF-alpha, interferon gamma and interleukin 6, and proteolysis-inducing factor, which is secreted by cancers.

Management
Corticosteroids, progesterone-like agents, selective adrenergic receptor modulators.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cachexia

Clinical medicine A state of severe weight lose and tissue wasting 2º to underlying disease–eg, AIDS, terminal CA, anorexia nervosa, or malnutrition. See Tumor necrosis factor.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ca·chex·i·a

(kă-kek'sē-ă)
A general weight loss and wasting occurring in the course of a chronic disease or emotional disturbance.
[G. kakos, bad, + hexis, condition of body]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cachexia

A state of severe muscle wasting and weakness occurring in the late stages of serious illnesses such as cancer. The usual condition of bodily decline in those dying after long debilitating illnesses. Cachexia is not due to malnutrition and research findings suggest that an important element in the causation may be selective depletion of the myosin heavy chain in myofibrillary proteins.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Cachexia

A condition of general ill health, malnutrition, undesired weight loss, and physical weakness, often associated with cancer.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ca·chex·i·a

(kă-kek'sē-ă)
General weight loss and wasting in the course of a chronic disease or emotional disturbance.
[G. kakos, bad, + hexis, condition of body]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Important limitations of this study include the lack of detailed information about the subjects such as lifestyle factors, occupation, diet, and other disease conditions; the sample collection having occurred after diagnosis and primarily post-mortem, so organochlorine levels in tissue may have changed from prediagnosis levels; a lack of information on BMI, which might influence adipose tissue levels of organochlorines; and no confirmation as to the effectiveness of the procedure for the exclusion of cachexic subjects.
The researchers found the compound in the urine of cachexic patients with lung, breast, ovarian, or pancreatic cancers.
The high level of HIV-related comorbidity is a reflection of continued late presentation of HIV patients, in addition to the compounding problems of TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS), (7) shared drug toxicities between antiretrovirals and antimycobacterials, and malabsorption of drugs in wasted, cachexic patients.
The bird weighed 846 g (normal weight range, 900-1360 g) (1) and appeared cachexic. On palpation, the abdominal area felt moderately distended and very firm.
For mice given the highest dose of 40 [micro]g, all succumbed or were moribund by 24 weeks of treatment after becoming severely cachexic. One mouse each in the 4 [micro]g and 0.4 [micro]g groups died at 31 and 38 weeks, respectively.
This leads to a "futile cycle," in which cells attempt to bring in great quantities of the body's stored glucose to supply the needed energy; when there is not enough glucose to meet the demand, the cachexic patient's tissues begin to break down.
On general examination, she was lethargic, cachexic, poorly built, poorly nourished.