bystander CPR

bystander CPR

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that is performed by a layperson who is not part of the organized emergency-response system in a community. Such a person is known as a CPR bystander. Since most cardiac arrests occur outside health care institutions, bystander CPR is an essential part of the chain of survival.
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The statement calls for a concerted effort by health care providers, policy makers, and community leaders to provide education and training to improve the rate and quality of bystander CPR (Circulation 2008 [Epub doi:10.
The program is also encouraging the general public to complete a CPR course to improve bystander CPR rates.
A spokesman for the Welsh Ambulance Services NHS Trust said, 'Communities that have high rates of bystander CPR have correspondingly high patient survival rates.
But a national 4,000-person survey showed that a much higher percentage of the public would be interested in providing bystander CPR if the procedure involved chest compression-only CPR.
Research shows that communities with higher bystander CPR participation have higher SCA survival rates.
The authors suggest that public health strategies should aim to improve the use of CPR by bystanders, which special attention to improving bystander CPR techniques for infants.
Residents of low-income, minority neighborhoods have two strikes against them: the incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is much higher than average and rates of bystander CPR are below average," said lead study author Comilla Sasson, MD, PhD, an associate clinical professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
The group discussed the importance of bystander CPR, access to automatic external defibrillators and screening for critical congenital heart defects for newborns.
Boosting bystander CPR rates in the United States from the current average of 27 percent to 56 percent could save an additional 1,500 lives per year.
The 2005 guidelines had noted the need to increase the use and improve the quality of bystander CPR.
But a Sarver Heart Center--sponsored, national 4,000-person survey showed that a much higher percentage of the public would be interested in providing bystander CPR if the procedure involved chest compression-CPR only.
At the time of hospital admission, half the patients who had received bystander CPR showed at least some form of conscious behavior.