byssus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

byssus

the threads which attach certain molluscs to the SUBSTRATE (2) or the stalk in some fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Choromytilus chorus has ganglion and nerve structures that are innervating important organs, as such as the pedal ganglion with the anterior muscles of the byssus retractor and muscles of the foot.
Before the experiments, to ensure initial severance did not influence final byssus measurements, oysters were detached by carefully severing the byssus near the byssus plaque from the mesh bag or conspecifics using a pair of scissors, and only juveniles that were byssally attached were selected for the research.
This strong adhesion is achieved through the secretion of a glue-like material called byssus. Mussel byssus is rich in the unusually rare L-dopa molecules.
(2) This is something other than coldness: the hilarious linguistic excess of the prior physical description of Mr Endon is suffused with a reverence for his delicacy and beauty, even as it sustains the challenge to adequate visualization--the "perfection" of the tiny hairy body, the immense skull "crackling" with stiff black hair and its one tress of white, the dressing gown of "scarlet byssus" and the "neo-merovingian poulaines of deepest purple" (105).
It refers possibly to a garment of sea silk, spun from byssus, the filament that the pinna nobilis mollusk uses to attach itself to the seabed.
It also found that the byssus or external filaments of P.
Coyne, "The peculiar collagens of mussel byssus," Matrix Biology, vol.
Majlis, Brigitte Khan and Anne Sicken 2014 Showing a bit of mussel: An unfamiliar and intriguing type of shiny gold coloured thread discovered in certain Iban Dayak textiles turns out to be shellfish-derived byssus fibre.
Mytilus byssus receives a 2- to 6.7-fold increase in stress induced by drag forces from epibiotic kelp [6].
Yet even those who can't be bothered to look up "byssal" (relating to the byssus, or silky filaments with which bivalves and mollusks cling to rocks) or "stour" (strong or powerful) cannot miss the poem's thick consonance, its glut of sibilants--byssal, mussels, scapular, cruxes, bassinet, clamshell, saddlebags--that bind these images together for eight rapid-fire lines before the softer Latinates of "mantle," "vulnerable," and "indomitable" emerge to clear the air and let in some light.
The crude extract of four species significantly inhibited the attachment of byssus: Tethya rubra (p = 0.0009), Tethya maza (p = 0.0039), Petromica citrina (p = 0.0277), and Hymeniacidon heliophila (p = 0.00003).
Unlike barnacles, which cement themselves tightly to the surfaces of rocks, piers or ships, the clamlike bivalves called mussels dangle more loosely from these surfaces, attached by a collection of fine filaments known as byssus threads.