byssus

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byssus

the threads which attach certain molluscs to the SUBSTRATE (2) or the stalk in some fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, collagen and collagen-like molecules in byssal tissue coordinate with L-DOPA-containing adhesive proteins and confer tensile strength to the byssal threads (Qin and Waite, 1995; Coyne et al., 1997; Martinez Rodriguez et al., 2015).
For example, the byssal attachment is influenced by salinity and temperature stressors in the juvenile scallop Pecten maximus (Christophersen & Strand 2003).
Kaichang Li, a professor at Oregon State University's College of Forestry, found that mussels secrete proteins known as byssal threads, which provide superior strength and extraordinary flexibility.
84 EMERSION AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON GROWTH RATES AND BYSSAL THREAD PRODUCTION IN TWO SYMPATRIC MARINE MUSSEL SPECIES
Mussel byssal thread, a fibrous biomaterial from bivalve mollusc, has also been investigated for decades.
Ink slurs into byssal threads, split blue caskets of mussels scapular in ritual archipelago, butter, cream, the chowder pot a holy trencher on a night stour, bitter with advent, wilted cruxes, tarragon, bassinet of clamshell, shucked, fragile saddlebags, houses primeval: slughead, mantle, foot, all vulnerable, indomitable.
Clams and cockles bury themselves in the sand, oysters cement themselves to a rock or reef, and mussels use their "beards" of strong byssal threads to anchor themselves on rocks or pilings.
Instead, the mussel anchors itself to a firm surface with a group of filaments called byssal threads or byssus, also known as the "beard" that has to be yanked off the shell before you start cooking.
After 24 h, the settlement of mussels at various concentrations was recorded and minimum concentration which prevented byssal production and attachment was denoted as [EC.sub.50] (effective concentration at which 50% of mussels showed inhibition of byssal attachment).
Truncilla macrodon was located by observing tracks in the substrate, such that one individual, for example, was attached to a conglomeration of sand by byssal threads.
The lower valve on which the scallop rests on the bottom has a paler color, is more convex, and also differs from the upper in having a byssal notch.
Most mussels have what is commonly called "the beard," also known as byssal threads.