bypass vessel

bypass vessel

a blood vessel which joins arteries and veins, thus bypassing capillaries. Constriction or dilation regulates the blood flow through the capillaries. See ARTERIOLE and Fig. 48 .
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Humacyte is also investigating its HAV as a lower extremity arterial bypass vessel in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD).
(9) However, if there is degeneration of the medial wall or complete occlusion, complete excision with interposition of a bypass vessel graft is recommended.
The lack of response to all resuscitation efforts and the development of cardiac standstill in a matter of minutes alongside convulsions during cardiac arrest suggests a massive thrombosis of not only the bypass vessel but probably all the coronary arteries and major cerebral vessels.
In a multivariate analysis, use of a saphenous vein as the bypass vessel was associated with an 82% increase in long-term patency compared with other types of bypass vessels, Dr.
Different proliferative properties of smooth muscle cells of human arterial and venous bypass vessels: role of PDGF receptors, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.
A: Bypass vessels, particularly when veins are used in contrast to arteries, can clog or narrow (note President Bill Clinton's recent incident), but it usually occurs years after the surgery.
"The purpose of the trial is to facilitate formation of bypass vessels by accelerating a natural process called angiogenesis or collateral vessel formation," Dr.
The patency of bypass vessels created from veins that were harvested using endoscopy was comparable to the patency of veins harvested with open surgery, after a mean follow-up of 7 months, Dr.
Artificial blood vessels would be particularly beneficial for patients requiring coronary artery or peripheral artery bypass, and who do not have enough veins or arteries to use as bypass vessels. An estimated 100,000 patients undergo bypass surgery each year in the United States.
The other study indicates that revving up blood concentrations of high-density lipoprotein--HDL, or good cholesterol--helps maintain clear bypass vessels.
At 5 years of follow-up, 63% of the bypass vessels maintained secondary patency and limbs were successfully salvaged in 78% of the patients.