by-product


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by-product

Chemical
A product of a chemical reaction or industrial process which differs from the desired product.

Radiation physics
A class of secondary radioactive material regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, despite of lower CT in the black tea byproduct than that in green, PPC and increment of in vitro fermentation with PEG in black tea by-product were higher than those in green one.
By-product synergy networks: Driving innovation through waste reduction and carbon mitigation.
My belief is that matrix, pressure sensitive by-product, and other non-intrusive non-recyclables will ultimately have value if a capital investment is made for appropriate packaging.
Sierra Nevada is reducing its energy costs and eliminating a manufacturing by-product that would otherwise add to its disposal and waste water expenditures.
The legislation is the EU Animal By-products Order 1999.
2] released to the atmosphere as a by-product of the sequestration process and less the amount of C[O.
But if the bone is waste or for pet food then it's a by-product and cannot be passed to the public.
The use of this by-product has been investigated as a soil amendment at relatively high application rates by Mosquera-Pardo and Gilkes (1991) on similar Western Australian soils.
This strong traffic growth, which will continue into January, was a deliberate by-product of a number of lower fare initiatives,'' said Ryanair chief executive Michael O'Leary.
Fuel cells are also being developed for other applications in which it is not only desirable but necessary to keep combustion by-product emissions to a minimum.
In actuality, gelatin is a by-product derived from the skin, connective tissue, and bones of animals.