buzz word


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buzz word

A term used in a specific way in a particular field, which is often a recent addition to the field’s jargon.
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The magazine claims the buzz word of the moment is no longer "metrosexual" but a "heteropolitan" whose role models include David Beckham, Tony Blair and Jamie Oliver.
This year's buzz word is chav,according to her book Larpers and Shroomers: The Language Report.
Obesity has been the buzz word on the lips of health experts, sporting greats and MPs over recent months.
SIR - Choice is the latest buzz word, with the Conservatives and Labour both unveiling their plans for health and education.
On the current dance music scene uplifting is a real buzz word amongst DJs and producers, but it's only when you witness the London Community Gospel Choir in full flow do you realise how debased the term has become.
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point or HACCP has become something of a buzz word in recent years and this book is a commendable attempt to explain what it really is and what it can do for any food business.
Is wind farm the new buzz word to environmentalists?
According to Susie the buzz word for the coming year is Bovvered, made popular by Catherine Tate.
BOUNCEBACKABILITY is the buzz word in football, but it hasn't yet reached cricket circles and it's hard to see England recovering from their third-Test hiding by South Africa in time for next week's fourth rubber.
TECHNOLOGY has been the buzz word in Ambridge over the past week or so with the setting up of the village website.