butyric acid

(redirected from butyryl)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to butyryl: butanoyl

butyric acid

 [bu-tir´ik]
a saturated fatty acid found in butter.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bu·tyr·ic ac·id

(byū-tir'ik as'id),
A foul-smelling acid occurring in butter, cod liver oil, sweat, and many other substances. It exists in two forms: normal butyric acid (also written as N-butyric acid), butanoic acid, which occurs in combination with glycerol in cow's butter; and isobutyric acid, 2-methylpropanoic acid, one of the intermediates in valine catabolism, found in combination with glycerol in croton oil and elsewhere.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

butyric acid

n.
A colorless organic acid, C4H8O2, occurring in animal milk fats and used in disinfectants, emulsifying agents, and pharmaceuticals. Also called butanoic acid.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

butyric acid

Chemistry
An oily carboxylic acid which smells like rancid butter, has an acrid taste and a sweetish aftertaste, like ether. It is present in rancid butter, parmesan cheese and vomit, and is produced in anaerobic fermentation by bacteria in the colon and axilla (resulting in body odour). It is used as a flavourant, perfume additive and cattle-feed supplement.

Fringe oncology
It is believed to have anticarcinogenic activity, especially the derivative, sodium butyrate.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bu·tyr·ic ac·id

(byū-tir'ik asid)
An acid of unpleasant odor occurring in butter, cod liver oil, sweat, and many other substances.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

butyric acid

A water-soluble saturated FATTY ACID occurring in animal milk fats. It has a strong rancid odour.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This indicates that glucosamine possesses lower thermal stability, which could be attributed to the lower molecular weight of glucosamine subunits (161 g mol-1) as compared to acyl glucosamine subunits of chitosan such as butyryl chitosan at 231 g mol-1, hexanoyl chitosan at 259 g mol-1, octanoyl chitosan at 287 g mol-1 and decanoyl chitosan at 315 g mol-1.
From the size obtained from the average of at least 30 particles from several micrographs, the diameter of LCh was around 1 - 2 um, the size did not differ significantly after acylated with butyryl groups.
Meanwhile the butyryl CoA: acetate CoA-transferase gene is associated with vegetarian feeding and to a lesser content available in omnivores [69].
Haslberger, "Quantification of butyryl CoA:acetate CoAtransferase genes reveals different butyrate production capacity in individuals according to diet and age," FEMS Microbiology Letters, vol.
Based on the geometrical comparison, these forms can be classified into two groups characterised by the torsion angle <C1-N1-C4-C5 denoted as conformer-A, -B, -C and -D for transoid butyryl fragment and conformer-E and -F for cisoid butyryl fragment (around -23.8[degrees] and 137.9[degrees], resp.).
The results show that atoms of the 4-tert-butyl, butyryl, and arenesulfonyl groups occupy different spatial positions relative to each other as described above.
Acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and butyryl cholinesterase (BChE) comprise a family of enzymes which include serine hydrolases.
Quinine (3) was the only alkaloid which possessed weak inhibitory potential against butyryl cholinesterase enzyme with IC50 value of 61.25 0.01 u moles/L relative to Eserine, the reference standard having IC50 value of 0.850.001 u moles/L.
We also measured levels of cholinesterase in whole blood and butyryl cholinesterase in plasma in maternal and umbilical cord blood.
Thes e compounds have s hown activity agains t Gram- pos itive and Gram-negative bacteria and als o anti- fungal activity along with the inhibition ability of acetyl cholines teras e, butyryl cholines teras e and lipoxygenas e enzymes etc [8-10].
The reaction was initiated by adding 10 L of 0.5 mM well-1 substrate (acetyl and butyryl thiocholine iodide), then adding 10 L DTNB (0.5 mM well-1).
As for the difference between the sensitivity and the specificity of the test (<17%), we found that variability in the acylcarnitine values was responsible for >85% of "false flagging." In particular, propionylcarnitine and butyryl (or isobutyryl)carnitine ratios just above the respective cutoff values were responsible for ~25% of the falsely flagged samples, whereas in reality these minor increases are of no pathological significance.