buttress

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buttress

(lip'ō-oks'ĭ-jen-ās),
A structure placed against the base of another to support or stabilize it.
[M.E. buteras, fr. O. Fr. bouterez, fr. Germanic]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Woodcock DW, Dos Santos G, Taylor D (2000) The Buttressed Blue Marble Tree: Wood and Growth Characteristics of Elaeocarpus angus-tifolius (Elaeocarpaceae) Annals of Botany 85: 1-6.
"After careful consideration of the issues, the Reserve Bank reached the conclusion that Westpac's 'buttressed branch' proposal would not be acceptable as an alternative to compliance with the local incorporation policy.
Moreover, because feminization was accompanied by a new discourse about women that involved a positive reimagining of the feminine and the domestic, it also buttressed a larger transformation in official understandings of women's roles and womanly characteristics in the building of Soviet socialism.
The foreword explains that "[a]lthough this study of Spanish Golden Age drama is underpinned by the traditional scholarly values of close reading of playtexts and knowledge of the world into which they were brought, it is buttressed by modern critical theory" (xi).
The expert presentations on the epidemiology of hazards and exposures are exceptional; these are nicely buttressed by well-written, but less thorough, presentations of the toxicology and environmental literature.
She has taken on the combined forces of political correctness, historical revisionism and pathological victimhood, all buttressed enthusiastically by much of the Canadian legal establishment.
These lies were always buttressed by the claim that they are the expression of God's will.
The chapter on haiku, buttressed by a first-hand knowledge of Wright's Japanese models, is one of the book's more original contributions.
This was buttressed by an editorial which attacked the newly accepted resolution as anachronistic and backward.
She sums up the quandary as follows: "You could have progressivity [higher tax rates on higher incomes], you could have low rates for the second earner, and you could have a tax arrangement that buttressed the traditional family.