butterfly weed


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Related to butterfly weed: Asclepias tuberosa

butterfly weed

n.
A North American milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) having showy clusters of usually bright orange flowers and a root that was formerly used in medicine. Also called pleurisy root.

pleurisy root

An herbal root which contains glycosides—e.g., asclepiadin, resins, volatile oil; it is antispasmodic, diaphoretic, expectorant, tonic, carminative and mildly cathartic, and has been used by herbalists for respiratory tract infections.
 
Toxicity
Fresh roots may cause vomiting and toxicity at high doses.
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Wild lupine and butterfly weed were significantly more abundant in Managed sites than either Disturbed or Abandoned.
Good Nectar Flowers: Butterfly Weed (Asdepias tuberosa), Bloodflower (Asdepias curassavica), Honeysuckles (Lonicera spp.)
Some plants, like butterfly weed, daffodils, or members of the onion family (allium) have unpleasant tasting sap.
As pastures give way to housing and roadsides are sprayed for weed control, plants like butterfly weed, Queen Anne's lace, and bee balm (scarlet bergamot) need new habitat in order to survive.
Not only does the book highlight recent additions to the Southern landscape such as bear's breeches, Japanese fiber banana, and angelonias, but new varieties of old favorites get renewed attention from Winter's text: bachelor buttons in three heights, a renewed popularity of butterfly weed, and a purple-leafed variety of elephant ears, well-known for their tolerance of sun and humidity.
Blue mist, sweet shrub, sweet spire, half-a-dozen species of local ferns, butterfly weed, and a number of other native plant species grace our flowerbeds with abundant green and vibrant color when in season.
Seeds of most hardy perennials--including bleeding heart, butterfly weed, columbine, delphinium, liatris, and penstemon--require a period of chilling to germinate.
Equally eye-catching in the garden are the gaillardia, the butterfly weed, and an often-seen roadside flower, Joe Pye weed.
Perennials--bee balm, butterfly weed, coral bells, hollyhock, lobelia, hosta, penstemon, foxglove and daylily.
A couple of my favorites are Tithonia (Mexican sunflower), and Asclepias annus, an annual butterfly weed".
Wants: watercress or wintercress, double hollyhocks (no white), long bearded wheat, mini black-eyed susan bush, butterfly weed (orange or purple), unusual morning glories.
There are a small number of perennials that resent ever being divided, like bleeding hearts (Dicentra), blue false indigo (Baptisia), butterfly weed (Asclepias), gas plant (Dictamnus), hellebores (Helleborus), lavender (Lavendula), Russian sage (Perovskia) and sea holly (Eryngium).