burrowing


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burrowing

(bŭr′ō-ĭng)
The formation of a subcutaneous tunnel made by a parasite or of a fistula or sinus containing pus.
References in periodicals archive ?
A significant part of these sediments could be caused by burrowing activity of beavers resulting in an erosion rate of 0.
Fallicambarus gordoni, like Distocambarus crockeri, another primary burrowing crayfish, was not limited to a water table that provided year-round access to free water in the burrow; rather, the species was able to withstand long periods of desiccation when the burrow is dry (Welch and Eversole, 2006).
After the cobras became more familiar with the tank and substrate we began to see occasional burrowing activity.
A burrowing owl symposium was scheduled in Lancaster on Friday, where experts planned to discuss the species' distribution and conservation strategies.
Just a stone's throw away, a brand-new multiplex cinema stands where other burrowing owls once lived.
Most likely, these were excavated by different males digging individual tunnels, or variation in soil forced a change in the direction of burrowing.
Jeff Ryder, aquarium facility Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Centre, is gratefully acknowledged for his assistance with the burrowing experiments.
Little is known about the winter ecology of the Western Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), a declining subspecies in North America (Wellicome & Holroyd 2001; Klute et al.
Burrowing owls' habit of bringing mammal dung to their burrows is an example of tool use, researchers say.
In the Great Plains, burrowing owls (Speotyto cunicularia) nest most commonly in black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) towns (Butts, 1973; Ross, 1974).
Drop-in guests such as diamondback rattlesnakes, burrowing owls, opossums, and coyotes snatch them up.
Burrowing is one of the most primitive characters in terrestrial ancestors of Arachnida (Decae, 1984) and it is still present in the most primitive members of that class.