aloe

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aloe

 [al´o]
1. a succulent plant, of the genus Aloe.
2. the dried juice of leaves of various species of Aloe, used in various dermatologic and cosmetic preparations.

al·oe

(al'ō), The genus name Aloe is pronounced al'ō-ē.
1. The dried juice from the leaves of plants of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), from which are derived aloin, resin, emodin, and volatile oils.
2. The dried juice from the leaves of Aloe perryi (socotrine aloes), of Aloe barbadensis (Barbados and Curaçao aloes), or of Aloe capensis (Cape aloes); used as a purgative; used topically in cosmetics where it has unproven value.

aloe

(ăl′ō)
n.
1. Any of various chiefly African plants of the genus Aloe, having rosettes of succulent, often spiny-margined leaves and long stalks bearing yellow, orange, or red tubular flowers.
2. See aloe vera.
3. aloes(used with a sing. verb)
a. A laxative drug obtained from the processed juice of certain species of aloe. Also called bitter aloes.
b. See aloeswood.

al′o·et′ic (ăl′ō-ĕt′ĭk) adj.

Aloe vera

A stemless plant of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), which has succulent leaves and grows in subtropical and tropical zones; aloe juice is rich in aloin, resin, emodin and volatile oils, and has a wide range of therapeutic uses.

Chinese herbal medicine
A vera is used topically for acne, athlete’s foot, burns, hemorrhoids, insect bites, premature balding, psoriasis and sunburns.

Fringe medicine
Aloe essence is said to balance and centre creative and vital life activities.
 
Herbal medicine
Aloe is used in Western herbal medicine for indications similar to that of Chinese herbal medicine.

Mainstream medicine
Aloe has been used in conventional medicine topically to manage radiation-therapy-induced burns.

Toxicity
Aloe should not be taken internally as it is a potent laxative; A vera extract has been known to be administered internally for constipation, dermatitis, gastritis, headaches, hepatitis, hypertension, hypotension, intestinal parasites and vertigo.

al·oe

(al'ō)
The dried juice from the leaves of Aloe perryi, and A. barbadensis or of A. capensis; used as a purgative and topically in cosmetics where it has unproven value.

al·oe

(al'ō)
The dried juice from the leaves of plants of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), from which are derived aloin, resin, emodin, and volatile oils.
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