bunk


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bunk

Drug slang
A regional street term defined as either:
(1) Fake cocaine, or
(2) Crack cocaine.

Vox populi
Nonsense; as in, “That’s a load of bunk.”
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
There were two bunks in the cabin, and into one of them, when he had cleared his lip, the stranger tossed his bed-roll.
Summary: Chennai (Tamil Nadu) [India], July 16 (ANI): Chennai police has launched a hunt to nab a gang, which threatened and attacked staff at a petrol bunk with long knives on Sunday night.
Summary: These factors will eventually develop the global bunk beds market within the forecast period.
)Jati Umra Mumbling indistinguishable words under his breath, leader of the opposition and PML-N President Shehbaz Sharif spent the weekend clearing out the top bunk in a Jaati Umra bedroom to prepare for the return of his elder brother Mian Nawaz Sharif.According to details available withThe Dependent,Mian Shehbaz was asked by his mother to clear out the top bunk of the bed that the two brothers share for Mian Nawaz to move back in.
Caesars says "Offering innovative experiences for group travel in the heart of the Strip, the iconic Flamingo Las Vegas debuts 14 new Bunk Bed Rooms, along with one of the largest dedicated Bunk Bed Suites in the U.S., as part of the second phase of the resort's room renovation, totaling a $156M investment to date.
Death of wushu athlete inside dorm an accident, PSC insists !-- -- Abac Cordero (philstar.com) - October 2, 2018 - 12:50pm MANILA, Philippines ndash It looked like a typical dorm, around 20 square meters in size, with three bunk beds for six persons, and a window-type air-conditioner that had seen better days.
Bunk 9's Guide to Growing Up: Secrets, Tips, and Expert Advice on the Good, the Bad, and the Awkward
One of the solutions they are looking at is the construction of triple deck bunk beds, which will allow them to increase the number of inmates per cell four times.
"Bunk in, bunk on, bunk off ", from around the same period, all probably derive from the American usage "bunk", "to cheat or deceive".