bullous impetigo


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Related to bullous impetigo: bullous pemphigoid
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impetigo

 [im″pĕ-ti´go]
a contagious skin disorder, caused by streptococci, staphylococci, or a combination of organisms and marked by vesicles or bullae that become pustular, rupture, and form yellow crusts; called also impetigo contagiosa or impetigo vulgaris. Impetigo usually occurs in children, especially very young infants because of their low resistance, and is spread by direct contact with the moist discharges of the lesions. If not properly treated, it can be serious or even fatal to newborn infants. Isolation of the patient is recommended if patient hygiene is poor or the patient is a newborn in a hospital. Gowns and gloves are worn if soiling is likely. Impetigo is a particular problem for hospital patients, who may become infected by infected hospital staff. Treatment may consist of local applications of an antibiotic ointment, keeping the lesions and surrounding skin clean, and exposing the lesions to air to encourage drying. Systemic antibiotics are often recommended. (See Atlas 2, Part G).
bullous impetigo a highly contagious type of impetigo, caused by Staphylococcus aureus and characterized by large pustules surrounded by reddened areas; transmission is by direct contact, by fomites, or by autoinoculation causing secondary infections in areas of the body not originally affected.
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BULLOUS IMPETIGO

bullous impetigo

A rare infection, usually occurring in infants, caused by a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that produces a toxin that splits the epidermis.
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See also: impetigo
References in periodicals archive ?
The day of appearance of Miliaria crystalline, Bullous impetigo, Oral candidiasis, Breast abscess and Sclerema neonatorum was similar to earlier studies (Smith 1965, Hodgman 1971, Rudoy 1975, Atherton 1992, Wagner 1995).
Neonates 1 Ophthalmia neonatorum 233 23.3 2 Bullous impetigo 89 8.9 3 Oral candidiasis 26 2.6 4 Periporitis staphylogenes 17 1.7 5 Breast abscess 1 0.1 Table XI.
On correlation of culture pattern with clinical diagnosis, the striking observation was that methicillin sensitive staphylococci was the predominant organism in 67.89% of impetigo contagiosa cases, 50% of bullous impetigo cases, 40% of folliculitis cases and 50% of furuncle cases.
Clinical Diagnosis Clinical Diagnosis Frequency Percentage Impetigo contagiosa 76 76 Folliculitis 10 10 Furuncle 08 08 Bullous Impetigo 04 04 Ecthyma 02 02 Total 100 100 Table 4.
Lymphadenopathy is rare in bullous impetigo but common in nonbullous impetigo.
The differential diagnosis for bullous impetigo is broad, and may include allergic contact dermatitis, herpes simplex, herpes zoster, pemphigus foliaceus, bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and (in this case specifically) erythema migrans.
In this case, the patient was diagnosed with bullous impetigo and admitted to the hospital.
Bullous impetigo appears with scattered lesions of erythema and macules, progressing to thin roofed bullae and subsequently to "honey-crusted" lesions.
Bullous impetigo is a superficial skin infection that is most commonly seen in children (especially under the age of 2 years).
Bullous impetigo is a variant of impetigo that produces exfoliative or epidermolytic toxins (ETA and ETB) in response to a staphylococcal infection.
Schachner suggested ruling out bullous impetigo, eczema, and histiocytosis with a scabies prep that tests positive for mite eggs or stool.
Infections in newborns that may present as bullae, erosions, or ulcers include bullous impetigo and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome.