bully

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bully

A person who uses physical or psychological means or force to get his or her way, esp. by intimidating or hurting others who may be smaller or weaker.
References in periodicals archive ?
Skiba points out that while bullies may not fit a stereotype, all bullies do have one thing in common: "They seem to be more rewarded by others' reactions to their bullying." Bullies may enjoy seeing their victim's angry or fearful reactions.
A factor analysis of data from 116 elementary school teachers indicated two types of bullying teachers: sadistic bullies and bully-victim bullies (Twemlow, Fonagy, Sacco, & Brethour Jr., 2006).
The DHHS notes that most bullying happens when adults are not around, so staying near adults and other children can help kids avoid situations where they might be vulnerable to bullies.
There is little opportunity for victims to escape from bullies when the tormentor is a sibling.
Conceptually the term bullying is subjective (Mishna, Scarcello, Pepler, & Wiener, 2005) and several findings suggest that preschool bullies exhibit social characteristics that differ to those found in non-bullies (Vlachou et al, 2011).
She was a shy girl and didn't speak up to her bullies, but I could tell something was wrong.
An Italian study of 4386 students indicated that both the bullies and their victims were all males13.
For the last several decades, bullying has been noted as a serious problem in schools, and it has been noted that students, teachers, administrators, parents, and community members need to work together to address ways to help victims, bullies, and bystanders develop coping strategies and prevent bullying.
Dental offices are not immune to the destructive effects of bullying, and bullies can be found throughout the hierarchy of the dental office: dental assistants, receptionists, dental hygienists, office managers, associates and dentists.
Three random-effects meta-analysis were performed and three groups of children were formed which were victims, bullies and bully-victims.
Boys tend to engage in cyberbullying, verbal bullying, and physical bullying more often than girls, but girls are social bullies more often than are boys.