element

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element

 [el´ĕ-ment]
1. any of the primary parts or constituents of a thing.
2. in chemistry, a simple substance that cannot be decomposed by ordinary chemical means; elements are the basic components of which all matter is composed.

Chemical elements are made up of atoms, each of which consists of a nucleus with a cloud of negatively charged electrons revolving around it. The two major components of the nucleus are protons and neutrons. The number of protons in the atoms of a particular element is always the same, and therefore the physical and chemical properties of the element are always the same. It is possible, however, for a chemical element to exist in several different forms, the difference depending on the number of neutrons in the nucleus of its atoms. Different forms of the same element are called isotopes.

There are at least 105 different chemical elements known. (See Appendix 6 for a list of the elements, and the symbol, atomic weight, and atomic number of each.) The atomic number of an element is determined by the number of protons in the nucleus of one of its atoms. The mass number of an isotope is determined by the total number of neutrons and protons in the nucleus.
Stable Chemical Elements. A stable chemical element is one that contains an optimal ratio or range of ratios between the number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus. A stable element does not spontaneously transmute into another element and therefore does not give off radiation. The stable elements are those that have an atomic number below 84, except for a few, such as potassium and rubidium, which are weakly radioactive.
Radioactive Chemical Elements. A radioactive chemical element does not contain an optimal proton-to-neutron ratio in its atomic nuclei and therefore readily gives off nuclear particles until all nuclei have attained the optimal combination of protons and neutrons. The spontaneous releasing of its nuclear particles changes the radioactive atom into a new atom (transmutation).ƒ

As radioactive elements disintegrate and form new chemical elements, a tremendous amount of energy is released. This emission of energy and nuclear particles is called radiation. The radiations may be electrically charged particles having size and mass, such as alpha particles and beta particles, or they may be nonparticulate and contain no electrical charges, such as gamma rays. Most radioactive elements give off either alpha or beta particles and at the same time emit gamma radiation.
formed e's of the blood the blood cells.
trace element a chemical element present or needed in extremely small amounts by plants and animals; such elements include manganese, copper, cobalt, zinc, and iron.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

el·e·ment

(el'ĕ-ment),
1. A substance composed of atoms of only one kind, that is, of identical atomic (proton) number, that therefore cannot be decomposed into two or more elements and that can lose its chemical properties only by union with some other element or by a nuclear reaction changing the proton number.
2. An indivisible structure or entity.
3. A functional entity, frequently exogenous, within a bacterium, such as an extrachromosomal element.
[L. elementum, a rudiment, beginning]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

element

EBM
In the context of a trial design, a basic unit of time within a clinical trial, which describes what is expected to happen to the subject (patient) during the period, when the period begins and rules for ending the element.

Informatics
A section of text in an XML document delineated by start and end tags, or, in the case of empty elements (elements with no content, only attributes), indicated by an empty tag.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

el·e·ment

(el'ĕ-mĕnt)
1. A substance composed of atoms of only one kind, i.e., of identical atomic (proton) number, which therefore cannot be decomposed into two or more elements, and which can lose its chemical properties only by union with some other element or by a nuclear reaction changing the proton number.
2. An indivisible structure or entity.
3. A functional entity, frequently exogenous, within a bacterium, such as an extrachromosomal element.
[L. elementum, a rudiment, beginning]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

element

(el'e-ment) [L. elementum, a rudiment]
Enlarge picture
TABLE OF ELEMENTS IN THE BODY
In chemistry, a pure substance consisting of only one type of atom. Further breakdown by nonchemical means of an element results in subatomic particles (protons, neutrons and electrons), which are indistinguishable from those from other elements. Elements exist in free and combined states. There are 110 named elements and others yet to be fully characterized and named. See: illustration

Oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur are found in all living organisms. These six elements and calcium make up 99% of the human body mass. Sodium, potassium, magnesium, chlorine, iodine, and iron form 0.9% of the body mass.

mobile element

A nucleotide sequence that can be inserted successfully into several different places in the genome.

movable genetic element

Transposon.

rare earth element

One of a series of metallic elements that follow lanthanum (at. no. 57) in the periodic table of elements and that have oxides with similar properties. The series comprises the 14-element lanthanide series (at. nos. 58-71 and includes praseodymium, promethium, and ytterbium.

trace element

An element needed by the body in very small amounts; many are essential for enzyme functioning. Trace elements include chromium, copper, fluoride, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and zinc.

ultratrace element

Any of those elements for which laboratory animals seem to have tiny dietary requirements, typically less than 1 µg/g. Elements in this category include arsenic, boron, bromine, cadmium, chromium, fluorine, lead, lithium, molybdenum, nickel, silicon, tin, and vanadium.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

element

a pure substance consisting of only one type of atom, that cannot be destroyed by normally available heat or electrical energy.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

el·e·ment

(el'ĕ-mĕnt)
Substance composed of atoms of only one kind that therefore cannot be decomposed into two or more elements and can lose its chemical properties only by union with another element or by nuclear reaction changing the proton number.
[L. elementum, a rudiment, beginning]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about element

Q. what consider to be a good nutrition for children? does it has to include some specific nutrition elements?

A. there's many things you should consider about children's nutrition, the amount of books written about kids nutrition can fill a library...
vitamins, organic vs industrial, fast food vs home made etc.
here are 2 video libraries that i'm sure you'll find all the info you seek in them-

http://www.thedoctorsvideos.com/categories/26/Nutrition

http://www.drmdk.com/html/nutrition.html

More discussions about element
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References in periodicals archive ?
* facilities that may not consist of the nine building elements, such as sheds, launch pads, roads, railways, fuel tanks
B&M Impex received three separate orders for customised building elements to be delivered according to a Just-in-time scheme.
It doesn't matter that a later chapter on building elements is rather skimpy because most of the information is available elsewhere in references listed in a full bibliography.
The Swedish construction group Skanska said on Wednesday (9 March) that it had decided to concentrate its Swedish manufacturing of prefab building elements to its facilities in Bollebygd and Strangnas.
The main building elements -- stucco walls, steel canopy, timber roof and concrete floor planes -- are compositionally and materially distinct, giving a lucid, tectonic expressiveness.
Finished in integral-color epoxy stucco, the shadows of the ribs and rectangular fields of orange irregularly repeat across a yellow background to create a sense of movement that harmonizes with the regular layout of the building elements.
The authors (two of the College of Estate Management and one the regional managing director at Franklin and Andrews) introduce the measurement of building elements in quantity surveying, first examining basic principles and then providing instruction on measuring materials needed for the different parts of building structures.
The Danish building elements manufacturer Consenta Holding A/S issued on Friday (30 January) its report for the first quarter of the financial year 2003/2004, posting a pre-tax loss of DKK0.6m, as compared to a loss of DKK15.6m in the corresponding period a year earlier.
Many of the interesting contrasts developed between the planes and surfaces of the various building elements reflect the order of construction, making decorative sense of the progress from first to second fix and on to finishes.
Passive building elements such as thermally improved walls and windows (Viracon VE-1-2M insulating glass with Argon) were chosen to greatly reduce energy usage.

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