buffer


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buffer

 [buf´er]
a substance that, by its presence in solution, increases the amount of acid or alkali necessary to produce a unit change in pH. The bicarbonate buffer system in the blood maintains a balance between bicarbonate and carbon dioxide ions and deterimnes the pH of the blood.

buff·er

(bŭf'ĕr),
1. A mixture of an acid and its conjugate base (salt), such as H2CO3 or HCO3-; H2PO4-/HPO42-, that, when present in a solution, reduces any changes in pH that would otherwise occur in the solution when acid or alkali is added to it; thus, the pH of the blood and body fluids is kept relatively constant (pH 7.45) although acid metabolites are continually being formed in the tissues and CO2 is lost in the lungs.
See also: conjugate acid-base pair.
2. To add a buffer to a solution and thus give it the property of resisting a change in pH when it receives a limited amount of acid or alkali.

buffer

/buf·fer/ (buf´er)
1. a chemical system that prevents changes in hydrogen ion concentration.
2. a physical or physiological system that tends to maintain constancy.

buffer

Etymology: ME, buffe, to cushion
a substance or group of substances that tends to control the hydrogen ion concentration in a solution by reacting with hydrogen ions of an acid added to the system and releasing hydrogen ions to a base added to the system. Buffers minimize significant changes of pH in a chemical system. Among the functions carried out by buffer systems in the body is maintenance of the acid-base balance of the blood and of the proper pH in kidney tubules. See also blood buffers, pH.

buffer

Chemistry
(1) A chemical system that minimises the effects—in particular the pH—of changes in the concentration of a substance.

(2) A molecule that serves to prevent large changes in pH by either combining with H+ or by releasing H+ into solution. 

(3) A system that minimises the changes in specific chemical species in solution against addition or depletion of the species.

(4) pH buffers: weak acids or weak bases in aqueous solution. The working range is given by pKa +/ 1.

(5) Metal ion buffers: a metal ion chelator (e.g., EDTA), partially saturated by the metal ion acts, as a buffer for the metal ion.

Computers
A storage zone that “resides” temporarily in the RAM (random access memory) and contains either input or output data, remaining there while waiting for an output (or less commonly, an input) device—e.g., a printer—to allow it access to perform a function. Buffer sizes can be increased with “spooling” software or by increased the printer’s RAM.
 
Drug slang
Regional street drug slang for a crack smoker or a woman who exchanges oral sex for crack.
 
Molecular biology
 A solution containing agents which maintain a constant pH during a biochemical reaction.
 
Vox populi
A person who acts as a go-between.

buffer

Chemistry A chemical system that minimizes the effects, in particular the pH, of changes in the concentration of a substance

buff·er

(bŭf'ĕr)
1. A mixture of an acid and its conjugate base (salt), such as H2CO3/HCO3; H2PO4/ HPO42-, which, when present in a solution, resists changes in pH that would otherwise occur in the solution when acid or alkali is added to it.
See also: conjugate acid-base pair
2. To add a buffer to a solution and thus give it the property of resisting a change in pH.

buffer

a chemical substance which has the capacity to bond to H+ ions, removing them from solution when their concentration begins to rise and releasing H+ ions when their concentration begins to fall. In this way buffers stabilize the pH of biological solutions and are thus important in maintaining HOMEOSTASIS. HAEMOGLOBIN is an excellent example of a buffer, maintaining a stable pH in the ERYTHROCYTE.

buffer,

n a substance in a fluid that tends to lessen the change in hydrogen ion concentration that otherwise would be produced by adding acids or alkalis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Streamside buffers offer multiple benefits, including filtering pollutants and cooling water, and providing habitat for pollinators and wildlife, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn said.
These clients need to understand that unlike most annuity products, where principal is entirely protected or income is guaranteed, a buffer annuity investment can produce a loss depending upon market performance.
For this recent buffer costs modeling effort, expert bioprocessing professionals having calculated their in-house costs for buffer preparation, were interviewed to collect their costs estimation data.
The regulatory provisions relevant for our analysis were buffer zone distance, buffer zone distance credits (e.
Wei Shi et al (2011) reported on Hierarchical Bit-line Buffer (HiBB) for shared buffer in network on-chip in that they mentioned corresponding to traffics the HiBB can be configured.
Because the sending rate is higher than the data consumption rate, there are high probabilities of buffer fullness.
Ascending order: Buffer capacity concentrated at end of line.
The buffer system used in the long-term study has three zones.
The pay-back period for the buffer and insulation is relatively short, and the energy policy involves neither an elaborate technical system nor complex engagement by the user.
The city adopted a 1993 ordinance that included a fixed 8-foot buffer and a 100-foot floating buffer around health clinics that requested it.
Having offered that mother-of-all caveats, Buffer goes on to explain that the United States, which possesses spy satellites that can practically read license plates from 50 miles in orbit, likely had little use for a small-shop operation such as UNSCOM.