budding


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budding

 [bud´ing]
a method of release of virus from a cell after replication has taken place: viral protein associates itself with an area of cell membrane, which forms a coat or envelope around the virus; some cellular proteins in the area of budding are replaced by virus-coded proteins.

gem·ma·tion

(jem-ā'shŭn),
A form of fission in which the parent cell does not divide, but puts out a small budlike process (daughter cell) with its proportionate amount of chromatin; the daughter cell then separates to begin independent existence.
Synonym(s): bud fission, budding
[L. gemma, a bud]

budding

Etymology: ME, budde
a type of asexual reproduction in which an organism produces a budlike projection containing chromatin that eventually detaches and develops into an independent organism. It is common in simple organisms, such as sponges, yeasts, and molds.
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Budding

budding

Cell biology
The process in which portions of cellular membranes from the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, nucleus and cell membrane itself are assembled into a vesicle, an intracellular organelle that shuttles proteins, secretory products and breakdown products throughout the cells.

Microbiology
A type of cell division in fungi and in protozoa in which one of the daughter cells develops as a smaller protrusion from the other. Usually the position of the budding cell is defined by polarity in the mother cell; in some protozoa the budded daughter is in the cytoplasm of the other daughter.

gem·ma·tion

(jem-ā'shŭn)
A form of fission in which the parent cell does not divide but puts out a small budlike process (daughter cell) with its proportionate amount of chromatin; the daughter cell then separates to begin independent existence.
Synonym(s): budding.
[L. gemma, a bud]

budding

a method of ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION common in some lower animal groups (e.g. COELENTERATES) in which part of the body wall bulges outwards and eventually forms a new individual which becomes detached from the parent. Budding can also take place in single-celled organisms such as yeasts, but here the process is more akin to MITOSIS with daughter cells of unequal size being produced. The production of ‘plantlets’ from the leaf margins of Bryophyllum is also called budding by some biologists. Certain VIRUSES can be released from cells or nuclei by budding. The virus interacts with the plasma membrane or nuclear membrane (depending on the virus), which wraps around it, and a bud forms. The membrane then pinches off and forms an envelope around the newly extruded virus.

budding

gemmation; asexual reproduction in which a portion of the cell body is thrust out and then becomes separated, forming a new individual.

budding virions
viruses that acquire their envelope by budding through modified regions of host cell membranes.
References in classic literature ?
And what right would that ruin have to bid a budding woodbine cover its decay with freshness?
They were quite changed, cautious as two diplomatists, and told each other things that had nothing to do with their budding sentiments.
I was tempted to gather their fresh petals, ornamented with delicate tentacles, some just blown, the others budding, while a small fish, swimming swiftly, touched them slightly, like flights of birds.
Pere Pamphile had seen Dantes pass not ten minutes before; and assured that he was at the Catalans, they sat down under the budding foliage of the planes and sycamores, in the branches of which the birds were singing their welcome to one of the first days of spring.
There were the little faces of the children, peeping from their bed apart and here the father's frame of strength, the mother's subdued and careful mien, the high-browed youth, the budding girl, and the good old grandam, still knitting in the warmest place.
There were the little faces of the children, peeping from their bed apart, and here the father's frame of strength, the mother's subdued and careful mien, the high- browed youth, the budding girl, and the good old grandam, still knitting in the warmest place.
If so, you will no more think the slight words, the timid looks, the tremulous touches, by which two human souls approach each other gradually, like two little quivering rain-streams, before they mingle into one--you will no more think these things trivial than you will think the first-detected signs of coming spring trivial, though they be but a faint indescribable something in the air and in the song of the birds, and the tiniest perceptible budding on the hedge-row branches.
Reuter's garden that my eyes dwelt; when I had taken a view of her well-trimmed beds and budding shrubberies, I allowed my glance to come back to herself, nor did I hastily withdraw it.
Then Deesa would look at his feet and examine his eyes, and turn up the fringes of his mighty ears in case of sores or budding ophthalmia.