budding


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budding

 [bud´ing]
a method of release of virus from a cell after replication has taken place: viral protein associates itself with an area of cell membrane, which forms a coat or envelope around the virus; some cellular proteins in the area of budding are replaced by virus-coded proteins.

gem·ma·tion

(jem-ā'shŭn),
A form of fission in which the parent cell does not divide, but puts out a small budlike process (daughter cell) with its proportionate amount of chromatin; the daughter cell then separates to begin independent existence.
Synonym(s): bud fission, budding
[L. gemma, a bud]

budding

Cell biology
The process in which portions of cellular membranes from the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, nucleus and cell membrane itself are assembled into a vesicle, an intracellular organelle that shuttles proteins, secretory products and breakdown products throughout the cells.

Microbiology
A type of cell division in fungi and in protozoa in which one of the daughter cells develops as a smaller protrusion from the other. Usually the position of the budding cell is defined by polarity in the mother cell; in some protozoa the budded daughter is in the cytoplasm of the other daughter.

gem·ma·tion

(jem-ā'shŭn)
A form of fission in which the parent cell does not divide but puts out a small budlike process (daughter cell) with its proportionate amount of chromatin; the daughter cell then separates to begin independent existence.
Synonym(s): budding.
[L. gemma, a bud]

budding

a method of ASEXUAL REPRODUCTION common in some lower animal groups (e.g. COELENTERATES) in which part of the body wall bulges outwards and eventually forms a new individual which becomes detached from the parent. Budding can also take place in single-celled organisms such as yeasts, but here the process is more akin to MITOSIS with daughter cells of unequal size being produced. The production of ‘plantlets’ from the leaf margins of Bryophyllum is also called budding by some biologists. Certain VIRUSES can be released from cells or nuclei by budding. The virus interacts with the plasma membrane or nuclear membrane (depending on the virus), which wraps around it, and a bud forms. The membrane then pinches off and forms an envelope around the newly extruded virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
(71,72) Additional studies will be necessary to understand the significance of PDCs and micropapillary architecture as possible prognostic markers independent of tumor budding.
The significance of tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma, as an independent prognostic factor for adverse clinical outcomes, has now been well established.
Tumor budding in colorectal cancer-ready for diagnostic practice?
Tumour budding: a promising parameter in colorectal cancer.
Tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma: time to take notice.
The role of tumour budding in predicting survival in patients with primary operable colorectal cancer: a systematic review.
Tumor budding as a risk factor for nodal metastasis in pT1 colorectal cancers: a meta-analysis.
Tumour Budding and Survival in Stage II Colorectal Cancer: a Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.
Systematic review and meta-analysis of the impact of tumour budding in colorectal cancer.
Prognostic value of tumor "budding" in patients with colorectal cancer.
Intra-tumoral budding in preoperative biopsy specimens predicts lymph node and distant metastasis in patients with colorectal cancer.
Prognostic significance of tumor budding in rectal cancer biopsies before neoadjuvant therapy.