nanotechnology

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nanotechnology

(nă″nō-tĕk-nŏl′ŏ-jē) [L. nanus, dwarf, + Gr. technē, art, + logos, word, reason]
The scientific study and engineering of chemical or biological objects measuring between 1 and 1000 nanometers. Objects this small are about the size of atoms or small molecules. “Wet” nanotechnology is the manipulation of organic or biological compounds in solution. “Dry” nanotechnology is the engineering of objects on silicon or carbon surfaces, such as those used in computing.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

nanotechnology

The application of the science of manipulation at an atomic level. The practical applications of the ability to move single atoms so as to construct molecules, materials, structures and even functioning machines at an atomic level. Nanotechnology is currently at a germinal stage but is expected to have extensive applications in medicine. See also MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
They find, after a previous study, the combination of buckyballs and PEI has shown its potential to capture vast amounts of emissions of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, from sources like industrial flue gases and natural-gas wells.
(88) The company responded by removing all "13+" labels on Buckyballs's product packaging, and also added a new label stating, "Keep Away From All Children," as well as language explaining the hazard of swallowing magnets.
In conclusion, we note that our calculations have shown that the bound state energies of charged particles, localized around nanosized spherical shells such as buckyballs, maybe adjusted by varying the radius R of the shell.
Tools such as fullerenes, nanotubes, buckyballs, dendrimers, quantum dots, nanoshells and others are described, considering their current uses and future possibilities.
Other molecules can be encased within the buckyball's spherical structure, so researchers are looking for ways to use it to deliver diagnostic or therapeutic chemicals to sites within the body.
The team used buckyballs as crosslinkers between amines, nitrogen-based molecules drawn from polyethyleneimine.
The experiment produced a variety of different sized and shaped carbon molecules although the buckyball or `C60' structures predominated.
The buckyball gases also match those found in meteorite samples, as well as gases found in deep soil layers linked to periods of extinction.
Smalley and crew named the molecule "buckminsterfullerene" ("buckyball," for short), after the geodesic domes of Buckminster Fuller, which they closely resembled.