buccinator muscle


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Related to buccinator muscle: Mentalis muscle, Masseter muscle, risorius muscle

buc·ci·na·tor mus·cle

(bŭk'si-nā'tŏr mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, posterior portion of alveolar portion of maxilla and mandible and pterygomandibular raphe; insertion, orbicularis oris at angle of mouth; action, flattens cheek, retracts angle of mouth; nerve supply, facial. Plays an important role in mastication, working with tongue to keep food between teeth; when it is paralyzed, food accumulates in the oral vestibule.
Synonym(s): musculus buccinator [TA] .

buccinator muscle

Facial muscle. Origin: pterygomandibular raphe and alveolar processes of jaws. Insertion: orbicularis oris muscle at angle of mouth. Nerve: facial (CN VII). Action: compresses check against teeth, retracts angle of mouth.
See also: muscle

buc·ci·na·tor mus·cle

(bŭk'si-nā'tŏr mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, posterior portion of alveolar portion of maxilla and mandible and pterygomandibular raphe; insertion, orbicularis oris at angle of mouth; action, flattens cheek, retracts angle of mouth; nerve supply, facial. Plays an important role in mastication, working with tongue to keep food between teeth; when it is paralyzed, food accumulates in the oral vestibule.
Synonym(s): musculus buccinator [TA] .

buccinator muscle (buk´sinātər),

n the muscle consisting of three bands and composing the wall of the cheek between the mandible and the maxilla; it causes the cheek to stay tight to the teeth and the lip corners to pull inward. It is often known as the “cheek muscle.”
References in periodicals archive ?
Passes through the buccinator muscle at a level opposite the second molar, causing slight retraction of the mucusa and the submucosal fat
The Stensen's duct, then, crosses horizontally off the anterior margin of the ramus of the mandible, passes laterally to the masseter muscle, goes around its anterior margin and through the buccinator muscle to end up into the oral cavity (Jebejian & Hajenlian, 1993; Gleeson, 1997).
The angle between the medial surface of the mandible and the buccinator muscle limits the buccotemporal space.
5,1,12] Other episodes have been attributed to anatomic abnormalities, including a patulous Stensen's duct, [4] masseter muscle hypertrophy, [5] and buccinator muscle weakness.