bubonic plague


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Related to bubonic plague: septicemic plague, pneumonic plague

bu·bon·ic plague

the usual form of plague manifestations of which include inflammatory enlargement of the lymphatic glands in the groin, axillae, or other parts.

bubonic plague

(bo͞o-bŏn′ĭk, byo͞o-)
n.
A form of infectious plague that is characterized by the formation of buboes and is transmitted to humans principally by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected rodent, usually a rat.
A rare bacterial infection due to Yersinia pestis; in its full-blown fulminant form—explosive Y pestis growth—it may kill in 24 hrs, by destroying normal tissues; after 3 days of incubation, high fever, black blotchy rashes—DIC—plus petechial hemorrhage, delirium; bursting of a bubo—a massively enlarged lymph node—is extremely painful
Epidemiology Y pestis is transmitted by Oriental rat fleas—Xenopsylla cheopis—which bite the rat, ingesting Y pestis; these rapidly reproduce in the flea, forming a ‘plug’ of obstructing bacteria in the flea’s gut, making the flea ravenously hungry and making it go into a feeding frenzy, in which it repeatedly bites the rat and regurgitates Y pestis; once the usual hosts—rats—die, the fleas becomes less discriminating and attack any mammal; in humans, aerosol is the common mode of transmission
Incubation 2–10 days
Mortality Without antibiotics, nearly 100%; with antibiotics, 5%

Medical History The Black Plague of Middle Ages Europe arrived with the Tartars in Sicily in late 1347, reaching Paris by the following winter; within 3–4 years, it had killed 25 million, 30% to 60% of Europe’s population at the time; Yersinia pestis infection of mammalian hosts is attributed to suppression and avoidance of the host’s immune defenses—e.g., phagocytosis and antibody production

bubonic plague

Black death, black plague Infectious disease A rare bacterial infection due to Yersinia pestis; in its full-blown fulminant form–explosive Y pestis growth–may kill in 24 hrs, by destroying normal tissues; after 3 days of incubation, high fever, black blotchy rashes–DIC plus petechial hemorrhage, delirium; bursting of a bubo–a massively enlarged lymph node–is painful enough to 'raise the dead' Clinical Painful, enlarged lymph nodes, fever, headache, prostration, pneumonia, sepsis Epidemiology Y pestis is transmitted by Oriental rat fleas–Xenopsylla cheopis, which bite the rat, ingesting Y pestis; these rapidly reproduce in the flea, forming a 'plug' of obstructing bacteria in the flea's gut, making the flea ravenously hungry, which goes into a feeding frenzy, repeatingly biting the rat and regurgitating Y pestis; once the usual hosts–rats–die, the fleas becomes less discriminating and attack any mammal; in humans, aerosol is the common mode of transmission Incubation 2-10 days Mortality Without antibiotics, nearly 100%; with antibiotics, 5%. See Yersinia pestis.

bu·bon·ic plague

(bū-bon'ik plāg)
The most common form of plague characterized by fever, cutaneous and visceral hemorrhages, and buboes (inflammatory enlargements of lymph nodes draining the bites of infected fleas). Clinical manifestations are caused by the flea-transmitted Yersinia pestis.

bubonic plague

A highly infectious disease caused by the organism Yersinia pestis, spread by rat fleas. There is high fever, severe headache, pain and swelling in the groin, severe TOXAEMIA and mental confusion. Antibiotics are effective.

bubonic plague

see BLACK DEATH.
References in periodicals archive ?
While bubonic plague is not a diagnosis that would immediately come to mind in a patient visiting an emergency department in Michigan, a thorough history revealed a recent trip to a bubonic plague-endemic area.
Fleas may also get the disease when they bite the infected human being with bubonic plague [I.sub.HB] or septicemic plague [I.sub.HS] at the rates [[GAMMA].sub.hbf] and [[GAMMA].sub.hsf], respectively.
It is important to remember that the danger of plague reoccurrence is not limited to the known natural foci, for example, those of Algeria [8] and of Angola, with two large bubonic plague outbreaks recorded in 1973 and 1975 [4].
Kyrgyzstan's emergency ministry said a young woman and two children from a different village who came into contact with Isakunov were hospitalised on Tuesday with the high fever and swelling around the neck and armpits characteristic of bubonic plague, local news outlets reported.
A medical check confirmed a 15-year-old boy, who died last Thursday, died of bubonic plague, Kyrgyzstan's Health Minister Dinara Saginbayeva said Monday.
The doctors who treated her admitted that the unusual symptoms were initially puzzling, but when they diagnosed bubonic plague they immediately started the treatment as time can make all the difference.
The Black Death, or bubonic plague, wiped out nearly half of Western Europe's population starting around 1350.
The opening was quickly followed by news reports of a breakthrough in a cure for the bubonic plague, by scientists at Albany Medical College in New York.
He is recognized as the microbiologist who first developed and used vaccines against cholera and bubonic plague. The government of India built the Institute, Haffkin Institute for Training, Research and Testing which is named after him in recognition for his work and his dedication.
Because bubonic plague is so rare in the U.S.--and potentially deadly--the victim's county and state health departments, as well as the CDC, all participated in investigating how the patients contracted the illness.
Ugarte says the boy, who had Down syndrome, died of bubonic plague July 26.
Cohn's Cultures of Plague applies a modern epidemiological method to Early Modern accounts of the bubonic plague in Italy and draws some surprising conclusions about how the plague was seen and managed.