bubonic


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bubonic

 [bu-bon´ik]
characterized by or pertaining to buboes; see plague.

bu·bon·ic

(bū-bon'ik),
Relating in any way to a bubo.

bu·bon·ic

(bū-bon'ik)
Relating in any way to a bubo.

bu·bon·ic

(bū-bon'ik)
Relating in any way to a bubo.

bubonic

characterized by or pertaining to buboes.

bubonic plague
a highly contagious and severe disease caused by the bacillus Yersinia pestis carried in infected rats and transmitted to humans by fleas. See also plague.
References in periodicals archive ?
Had Echenberg checked documents found in the archives of the India Office Library and the Manuscript Room of the British Library in London, he would have found that the official British responses to bubonic plague in India were closely modeled on their responses to cholera in the years since the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869.
Which animal and which insect were responsible for spreading the bubonic plague?
Beyond suggesting that bubonic plague can lurk within rat populations for years without causing human epidemics, Keeling and Gilligan's work published in the Oct.
The reasoning behind the diagnosis of bubonic plague is faulty, being based on a literal and incorrect historical inference.
During almost 20 years as Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Vector-Borne Infections Diseases, he was instrumental in building the division into a key centre for research into arthropod-borne infections, such as encephalitis viruses, yellow fever, and bubonic plague.
com/world/2013/dec/20/bubonic-plague-outbreak-deaths-madagascar) Madagascar by the return of Bubonic Plague, which experts feared as it can be stronger than its last invasion that wiped one-third of Europe's population during the middle ages.
Bubonic plague quarantine has been lifted completely, the disease has been localized, the press service of the Kyrgyz Ministry of Health reported on September 5.
Cattle herder Temir Issakunov, 15, contracted the disease, also known as bubonic plague, when he ate barbecued marmot at his remote mountain village of Ichke-Zhergez in north-eastern Kyrgystan.
Which creature was ultimately responsible for the bubonic plague epidemics of the Middle Ages?
Set in Los Angeles in 1962, when being openly gay was as popular as having the bubonic plague, we're plunged headfirst into his terrible grief.
Writing (as an "Orientalist") in the early years of the twenty-first century, Borsch contrasts what he takes to be the entirely forward-looking and enlightened responses of the English landholding classes (no mention of the Church as holder of 20-25% of the land of England) to the demographic hemorrhages caused by the bubonic plague in and after 1348 / 49 with (2) the initiative-stifling responses made by the land-holders of Egypt, the Mamluk ruling elite.