brux

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brux

(brŭks)
intr.v. bruxed, bruxing, bruxes
To clench or grind one's teeth.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although this activity may be closely related to muscle pain, the association may be difficult to identify, since most patients are unaware of their bruxing or clenching activities.[24]
This will discourage bruxing activities and minimize the load on the teeth and joints.
People with neurological and neuromuscular disorders, such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation and closed head injuries are prone to salivary incontinence (drooling), and severe bruxing (tooth grinding) habits that may result in excessive wear of teeth and injury to the temporomandibular joint (Richmond, Rugh, Dolfi, et al., 1984).
Heavy occlusal forces: Ceramic restorations may fracture when they lack bulk or are subjected to excessive occlusal stress, as in patients who have bruxing or clenching habits.
The antidepressants she takes cause bruxing (4)and we constantly monitor for wear, recession and abfractions.
Medical history of potential oral symptoms associated with GERD was carefully collected and the following parameters was evalu- ated; brushing method, dental erosion, dental sensitivity, loss of dental structure because of abnormal attrition (clenching or bruxing of one tooth surface against another), physical wear by extraneous objects such as toothbrushes, also known as tooth abrasion, alteration of the mucosa.
"These patients were found to be more prone to bruxing and clenching, probably because they are very tense and have erratic sleep patterns, etc." says senior author Sebastian Ciancio, professor and chair in the Department of Periodontology at the University of Buffalo School of Dental Medicine.
(1) Once initiated, muscle fatigue and soreness occurring in the jaw joint are often aggravated by grinding, clenching and bruxing. (24-27) Certain habits such as poor posture, stress, prolonged computer use, chewing gum, and eating hard foods may exacerbate an existing TMD condition.
* Oral functions were measured, including chewing ability and parafunctional phenomena such as bruxing, clenching, and fatigue/stiffness in the temporomandibular joint.