bruise

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contusion

 [kon-too´zhun]
injury to tissues with skin discoloration and without breakage of skin; called also bruise. Blood from the broken vessels accumulates in surrounding tissues, producing pain, swelling, and tenderness, and the discoloration is the result of blood seepage just under the skin. Most heal without special treatment, but cold compresses may reduce bleeding if applied immediately after the injury, and thus may reduce swelling, discoloration, and pain.

If a contusion is unusually severe, the injured part should be rested and slightly elevated; later application of heat may hasten absorption of blood. Serious complications may develop in some cases. Normally blood is drawn off from the bruised area in a few days, but occasionally blood clotted in the area may form a cyst or may calcify and require surgical treatment. Contusions may also be complicated by infection.
cerebral contusion contusion of the brain following a head injury. It may occur with extradural or subdural collections of blood, in which case the patient may be left with neurologic defects or epilepsy. (See also cranial hematoma.)

bruise

(brūz), Avoid applying this word to hemorrhagic lesions (e.g., extravasation of blood due to coagulation disorder or leakage of blood at a venipuncture site) that are not due to blunt injury.
A blunt injury producing a hematoma or diffuse extravasation of blood without rupture of the skin.
[M.E. bruisen, fr. O.Fr., fr. Germanic]

bruise

(brldbomacz) contusion.

bruise

(bro͞oz)
n.
An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations; a contusion.

bruise

bruise

noun A contusion secondary to traumatic injury of the soft tissues which interrupts capillaries and causes leakage of red cells (RBCs). A bruise appears in the skin as a non-blanchable reddish-purple discolouration. As it fades, it transitions from brown to green to yellow as the body metabolises the RBCs and haeme pigment.
 
Management
Local ice packs after injury.
 
verb To inflict an injury on a person physically or mentally.

bruise

A contusion 2º to traumatic injury of the soft tissues which interrupts capillaries and causes leakage of RBCs; in the skin it appears as a reddish-purple discoloration which does not blanch when pressed upon; when it fades it becomes green and brown as the body metabolizes the RBCs in the skin Management Local ice packs after injury

bruise

(brūz)
1. An injury producing a hematoma or diffuse extravasation of blood withoutrupture of the skin.
2. Synonym(s): contuse.
[M.E.bruisen, fr. O.Fr., fr. Germanic]

bruise

The appearance caused by blood released into or under the skin, usually as a result of injury, but sometimes occurring spontaneously in case of bleeding disorders or disease of the blood vessels.

bruise

a discoloration of the skin due to extravasation of blood into the underlying tissues.

bruise

haematoma formation without rupture of overlying skin

bruise,

n a contusion or ecchymosis; injury, usually caused by blunt impact, in which the capillaries are damaged, allowing blood to seep into the surrounding tissue. Normally minor but painful. Can be serious, leading to hematoma, or can be associated with serious injuries, including fractures and internal bleeding. Minor ones are easily recognized by their characteristic blue or purple color in the days following the injury.

bruise

superficial discoloration due to hemorrhage into the tissues from ruptured blood vessels beneath the skin surface, without the skin itself being broken; called also contusion.
References in classic literature ?
Are not you bruised, and cut over your chest and shoulders?
Yet I was so weak and bruised in the sides with the squeezes given me by this odious animal, that I was forced to keep my bed a fortnight.
A man-trained boy would have been badly bruised, for the fall was a good fifteen feet, but Mowgli fell as Baloo had taught him to fall, and landed on his feet.
I staggered through the trees, fell into a ditch and bruised my knees against a plank, and finally splashed out into the lane that ran down from the College Arms.
One would think that this was enough for one day, but Mynheer Boxtel did not seem to think so, as, in addition to having his clothes torn, his back bruised, and his hands scratched, he inflicted upon himself the further punishment of tearing out his hair by handfuls, as an offering to that goddess of envy who, as mythology teaches us, wears a head-dress of serpents.
Then they were loaded off in some large city, and Michael continued on in greater quietness and comfort, although his injured foot still hurt and was bruised afresh whenever his crate was moved about in the car.
This struck the Unworthy Man on the head and set him rubbing that bruised organ vigorously with one hand while vainly attempting to expand an umbrella with the other.
I know that I sprang forward, bent upon murder; I know that I was found in the gray of the morning, bruised and bloody, with finger marks upon my throat.
If I thus seem to cry out as one hurt, please remember that I have been sorely bruised and that I do dislike the thought that any son or daughter of mine or yours should be similarly bruised.
Sol Witberg would have bitten his bruised and swollen lip in chagrin, had it not hurt so much.
President Barbicane reached his house, bruised, crushed, and squeezed almost to a mummy.
The pride and obstinacy of millers and other insignificant people, whom you pass unnoticingly on the road every day, have their tragedy too; but it is of that unwept, hidden sort that goes on from generation to generation, and leaves no record,--such tragedy, perhaps, as lies in the conflicts of young souls, hungry for joy, under a lot made suddenly hard to them, under the dreariness of a home where the morning brings no promise with it, and where the unexpectant discontent of worn and disappointed parents weighs on the children like a damp, thick air, in which all the functions of life are depressed; or such tragedy as lies in the slow or sudden death that follows on a bruised passion, though it may be a death that finds only a parish funeral.