bruise


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contusion

 [kon-too´zhun]
injury to tissues with skin discoloration and without breakage of skin; called also bruise. Blood from the broken vessels accumulates in surrounding tissues, producing pain, swelling, and tenderness, and the discoloration is the result of blood seepage just under the skin. Most heal without special treatment, but cold compresses may reduce bleeding if applied immediately after the injury, and thus may reduce swelling, discoloration, and pain.

If a contusion is unusually severe, the injured part should be rested and slightly elevated; later application of heat may hasten absorption of blood. Serious complications may develop in some cases. Normally blood is drawn off from the bruised area in a few days, but occasionally blood clotted in the area may form a cyst or may calcify and require surgical treatment. Contusions may also be complicated by infection.
cerebral contusion contusion of the brain following a head injury. It may occur with extradural or subdural collections of blood, in which case the patient may be left with neurologic defects or epilepsy. (See also cranial hematoma.)

bruise

(brūz), Avoid applying this word to hemorrhagic lesions (e.g., extravasation of blood due to coagulation disorder or leakage of blood at a venipuncture site) that are not due to blunt injury.
A blunt injury producing a hematoma or diffuse extravasation of blood without rupture of the skin.
[M.E. bruisen, fr. O.Fr., fr. Germanic]

bruise

(brldbomacz) contusion.

bruise

(bro͞oz)
n.
An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations; a contusion.

bruise

bruise

noun A contusion secondary to traumatic injury of the soft tissues which interrupts capillaries and causes leakage of red cells (RBCs). A bruise appears in the skin as a non-blanchable reddish-purple discolouration. As it fades, it transitions from brown to green to yellow as the body metabolises the RBCs and haeme pigment.
 
Management
Local ice packs after injury.
 
verb To inflict an injury on a person physically or mentally.

bruise

A contusion 2º to traumatic injury of the soft tissues which interrupts capillaries and causes leakage of RBCs; in the skin it appears as a reddish-purple discoloration which does not blanch when pressed upon; when it fades it becomes green and brown as the body metabolizes the RBCs in the skin Management Local ice packs after injury

bruise

(brūz)
1. An injury producing a hematoma or diffuse extravasation of blood withoutrupture of the skin.
2. Synonym(s): contuse.
[M.E.bruisen, fr. O.Fr., fr. Germanic]

bruise

The appearance caused by blood released into or under the skin, usually as a result of injury, but sometimes occurring spontaneously in case of bleeding disorders or disease of the blood vessels.

bruise

a discoloration of the skin due to extravasation of blood into the underlying tissues.

bruise

haematoma formation without rupture of overlying skin

bruise,

n a contusion or ecchymosis; injury, usually caused by blunt impact, in which the capillaries are damaged, allowing blood to seep into the surrounding tissue. Normally minor but painful. Can be serious, leading to hematoma, or can be associated with serious injuries, including fractures and internal bleeding. Minor ones are easily recognized by their characteristic blue or purple color in the days following the injury.

bruise

superficial discoloration due to hemorrhage into the tissues from ruptured blood vessels beneath the skin surface, without the skin itself being broken; called also contusion.
References in classic literature ?
Aouda had escaped unharmed, and Fix alone bore marks of the fray in his black and blue bruise.
Upon the face were many severe scratches, and, upon the throat, dark bruises, and deep indentations of finger nails, as if the deceased had been throttled to death.
Bobby Wick, with an ugly bruise on his freckled nose, a sick and shaky detachment to manoeuvre inship, and the comfort of fifty scornful females to attend to, had no time to feel homesick till the Malabar reached mid-Channel, when he doubled his emotions with a little guard-visiting and a great many other matters.
He had then lain, beyond the vestibule, very much as he was lying now - quite, that is, as he appeared to have fallen, but all so wondrously without bruise or gash; only in a depth of stupor.
There is, of course, the other woman, the drink, the push, the blow, the bruise, the sympathetic sister or landlady.
He had been dead some days, but there was no wound or bruise upon his person to show how he had met his dreadful end.
I was unharmed except for a slight bruise upon my forehead where it had struck the stone flagging as I fell.
On examination we discovered that he had been seriously wounded in the leg by a /tolla/ in the course of the pursuit, but that the chain armour had prevented his last assailant's spear from doing anything more than bruise him badly.
I do not remember to have felt a bruise, nor any shock either.
Now by the bright eyes of Nan o' the Mill, and by mine own name and that's Wat o' the Crabstaff, and by mine own mother's son, and that's myself, will I, even I, Wat o' the Crabstaff, meet this same sturdy rogue, and gin he mind not the seal of our glorious sovereign King Harry, and the warrant of the good Sheriff of Nottinghamshire, I will so bruise, beat, and bemaul his pate that he shall never move finger or toe again
The maid had entered with us, and began once more to foment the bruise upon her mistress's brow.
Casaubon's theory of the elements which made the seed of all tradition was not likely to bruise itself unawares against discoveries: it floated among flexible conjectures no more solid than those etymologies which seemed strong because of likeness in sound until it was shown that likeness in sound made them impossible: it was a method of interpretation which was not tested by the necessity of forming anything which had sharper collisions than an elaborate notion of Gog and Magog: it was as free from interruption as a plan for threading the stars together.