Brown

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Brown

(brown),
Lester, U.S. otologist. See: Brown sign.

Brown

(brown),
Harold W., 20th-century U.S. ophthalmologist. See: Brown syndrome.

Brown

(brown),
James, U.S. plastic surgeon, 1899-1971. See: Brown-Adson forceps.

Brown

(brown),
James H., 20th-century U.S. microbiologist. See: Brown-Brenn stain.

Brown

(brown),
Robert, English botanist, 1773-1858. See: brownian motion, brownian movement, brownian-Zsigmondy movement.
A number of individuals with the surname Brown have become the namesake for various conditions, including

(1) C.H. Brown (Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome, also known as pontobulbar palsy with deafness);

(2) C.L. Brown (Brown-Symmers disease, also known as acute infantile encephalopathy);

(3) G.E. Brown (Horton-Magath-Brown syndrome, also known as Horton syndrome);

(4) J.W. Brown (Brown syndrome, also known as neural crest syndrome); and

(5) S.I. Brown (Brown syndrome, a term of recent vintage for corneal oedema following cataract extraction)

Patient discussion about Brown

Q. Is there any difference between brown eggs and white eggs? My fitness instructor suggested me to have brown eggs instead of white eggs so is there any difference between brown eggs and white eggs?

A. I have to agree with you. Never heard of any difference between the two and it doesnt sound reasonable that one is better to your health than the other...

Q. hey how about having brown rice in place of white or boiled rice…….?

A. Brown rice is a good carb, plus I personally think it tastes delicious.

Q. what is more healthy, brown sugar or fruit sugar?

A. fruit sugar

More discussions about Brown
References in classic literature ?
"Well said, Goodman Brown! I have been as well acquainted with your family as with ever a one among the Puritans; and that's no trifle to say.
"If it be as thou sayest," replied Goodman Brown, "I marvel they never spoke of these matters; or, verily, I marvel not, seeing that the least rumor of the sort would have driven them from New England.
"Can this be so?" cried Goodman Brown, with a stare of amazement at his undisturbed companion.
John Brown found himself ill at ease in his wire-cushioned arm-chair, by the glowing grate of anthracite which heated his handsome parlor.
Brown been accustomed to hear the echoes of his own fancy in the wind.
Brown contrived to burrow a passage through the snow-drift, and, with his bare head bent against the storm, floundered onward to Peter's door.
Father Brown flung down his paper, and, knowing the office door to be locked, went at once into the cloak room on the other side.
The moment he caught sight of Brown's black silhouette against the sunset, he tossed down a scrap of paper with a number and called out with amiable authority: "I want my hat and coat, please; I find I have to go away at once."
Sir Charles brightened on being reminded of Donovan Brown. "I shall esteem an introduction to him a great honor," he said.
"When Brown was an unknown and wretchedly poor man, my mother, at the petition of a friend of his, charitably bought one of his pictures for thirty pounds, which he was very glad to get.
Father Brown began to get to his feet in some disorder.
"This is very serious," said Father Brown, gathering his errant hat and umbrella and standing up; "in point of fact I was just putting your case before this gentleman, and his view--"