brownfield

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brownfield

An abandoned, idled or underused industrial and commercial property, the reuse or redevelopment of which is complicated by real or perceived contamination. Brownfield sites have received US EPA funding for redevelopment.
References in periodicals archive ?
brownfields can reduce the pressure to develop and pay for greenfields.
Reclaimed brownfields also create new space--previously unavailable
"The Brownfield Incentive Grant is the first in a series of new programs for brownfields, and each will help land owners and developers cleanup contaminated properties and bring them back into productive use."
"Brownfields are a long-term blight on our communities because the added cost to manage contamination discourages land owners and developers, who then look elsewhere for clean properties to develop," said Dr.
The anonymous survey (see Figure 2) was given to the volunteer participants of the mayor's Brownfields Roundtable at a regular monthly meeting.
A resolution of 20 [m.sup.2] was chosen based on sizes of known brownfields; a majority of brownfields would be larger than one pixel with this resolution.
Harrisburg is one of the nine communities in Pennsylvania, and a total of 149 communities nationwide, selected to receive 151 grant awards totaling $64,623,553 in EPA Brownfields funding.
The brownfields program was created in 2002 by bipartisan legislation to assist communities with the cleanup of former industrial properties where environmental contaminants complicate redevelopment.
The City of Duluth is using the tool in its Duluth-Fairmount Brownfields Revitalization Plan.
Brownfields are contaminated sites such as old gas stations, dry cleaning facilities, former factories and power plants.
The developed countries have a relatively long experience with the problems of brownfields, beginning already in the 1970s as a result of a massive decline in the mining, heavy and textile industries, and subsequently in the engineering sector as well (Kirkwood, 2001; Davis and Sherman, 2010; Hutton, 2010).
Any site that has been altered by human activity can be considered brownfield. The term includes not just derelict areas in towns and cities, but quarries, brick-pits, old railway lines, gardens and disused airfields.