Sorghum

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Related to broomcorn: broomcorn millet

Sorghum

grass genus in the plant family Poaceae; can cause cyanide and nitrate-nitrite poisoning; the cyanide poisoning may be in the peracute, lethal, anoxia form or a chronic form manifested by spinal cord degeneration, ataxia, urinary incontinence and consequential pyelonephritis, or as congenital deformities including arthrogryposis. Includes Sorghum almum, S. bicolor (S. vulgare, grain sorghum), S. halepense (Johnson grass), S. sudanense, S. verticilliflorum. Includes very valuable fodder crops used extensively as ensilage or green chop, and a grain sorghum used for lot feeding. Fodder sorghum is the more dangerous but both should be considered as potentially poisonous.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cloning and expression analysis of drought-tolerant and water-saving related gene PmMYB in broomcorn millet.
Waxy phenotype evolution in the allotetraploid cereal broomcorn millet: mutations at the GBSSI locus in their functional and phylogenetic context.
Molecular basis of the waxy endosperm starch phenotype in broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.
Genetic diversity and phylogeography of broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.
Martin explains that broomcorn is different because the fiber on the end draws the dirt.
Nothing does it better than this," he says, "not even the new marl-made fibers can compare with broomcorn.
Despite a vast variety of mass-produced brooms available on the market today, many people prefer a broom made with broomcorn.
Additionally, the Martins put on their annual Broomcorn Festival in September where visitors can see the hand-worked manufacturing process up close and listen to bluegrass music.
Raw broomcorn tops were held against the spinning drum until the seeds had been stripped off.
In on the bottom, out on the top," Mark recites as he whips a long needle through the stalks of broomcorn.
Proso, or broomcorn millet, and pearl millet (which is said to be easy to thresh) are the varieties most used for human consumption.
I do grow and recommend small plots of oats and storage corns: popcorn, dent corn for grinding into meal, grain sorghums, broomcorn, and old-fashioned open-pollinated sweet corns left to mature and dry on the stalk for parching (heating in a pan coated with a little hot oil for a chewy semi-popped treat).