brood

(redirected from broods)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

brood

(brūd),
1. Synonym(s): litter (2)
2. To ponder anxiously; to meditate morbidly.

brood

(bro͞od)
n.
The young of certain animals, especially a group of young birds hatched at one time and cared for together.
v. brooded, brooding, broods
v.intr.
a. To sit on or hatch eggs.
b. To protect developing eggs or young.
v.tr.
a. To sit on or hatch (eggs).
b. To protect (developing eggs or young).
adj.
Kept for breeding: a brood hen.

brood′ing·ly adv.

brood

Veterinary medicine
noun A posse of young birds hatched simultaneously.
 
Vox populi
noun A popular term for one’s offspring.

verb To ruminate upon something to a morbid degree; to ponder, often melancholily.
References in periodicals archive ?
At least they have time to recover but it is not surprising that, in general, great tits raise just one brood per year.
Distributions of each metric were calculated by pooling all observed zoeae across all broods. A probability density function was then calculated for each metric by using a band-width determined by Sheather and Jones's (1991) criteria.
Our reduced breeding success estimates could have been a result of methodological differences in counting broods. Using radio telemetry we were able to locate all marked breeding females, whilst counts using pointing dogs may over-estimate reproductive success of un-marked females.
Burying beetles (genus Nicrophorus) are potentially a model system for the study of the conditions that drive the evolution of brood parasitism.
While some physiological characters correlate with the morphological characters (Guler, 1999), others such as brood cycle, are genetically determined (Louveaux, 1973; Strange et al., 2007).
We determined the parentage of 276 nestlings from a total of 77 broods produced both before and after the experiments started (43 broods from the reciprocal experiment, 23 from the all-supplemented treatment, and 11 from the communal feeders treatment).
Initiation dates of first clutches for the three females that attempted second broods were estimated as 7, 5, and 7 June, respectively.
Synchronized generations of three Magicicada species designated as Brood II reliably emerge every 17 years in a swath of the U.S.
Cicada researchers are using observations from citizen scientists, along with automated devices equipped with GPS, to make more accurate records of Brood II's emergence than any cicada invasion before.
Brood XIX, a 13-year brood of periodical cicadas, has the largest distribution of the periodical cicada broods, being reported from Maryland south to Georgia, westward through Arkansas and easternmost Oklahoma, and north into southern Iowa.
In general, results indicate that parasites may strongly affect reproduction of female mosquitofish by reducing the number of embryos in developing broods. However, samples were small, so caution should be taken in drawing definitive conclusions without additional work.
The final brood starved to death after the mother was torn apart.