brood

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brood

(brūd),
1. Synonym(s): litter (2)
2. To ponder anxiously; to meditate morbidly.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

brood

(bro͞od)
n.
The young of certain animals, especially a group of young birds hatched at one time and cared for together.
v. brooded, brooding, broods
v.intr.
a. To sit on or hatch eggs.
b. To protect developing eggs or young.
v.tr.
a. To sit on or hatch (eggs).
b. To protect (developing eggs or young).
adj.
Kept for breeding: a brood hen.

brood′ing·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

brood

Veterinary medicine
noun A posse of young birds hatched simultaneously.
 
Vox populi
noun A popular term for one’s offspring.

verb To ruminate upon something to a morbid degree; to ponder, often melancholily.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
As drama, this broodingly intense, fierce and visually dazzling yarn of a young man seeking revenge for his pappy's death is neither original nor even particularly coherent, but helmer Fernando Spiner brilliantly makes his point about the violence that underpins both Argentinean and American popular culture.
The Things I've Seen Today side-steps her accustomed sepia-jazz delivery, sounding more akin to a female Chris Isaak alternative, full of broodingly spacious guitar twang.
Moreover, even though Miriam is "very much dissatisfied with her lot," and "[wants] a chance like anybody else," asserting that "[i]t's not fair because [she is] a woman" (S & L 185), when Paul volunteers to educate her, she lapses into "sucking her finger broodingly" (S & L 186).
Trim, dark and broodingly handsome, it's not just his looks that betray his Spanish roots.
Reactions to the eponymous anti-hero, whom the narrator repeatedly insists is nothing but a sadistic, thuggishly self-absorbed brute, indicate how thoroughly he was imbued by Moore's readers with the glamour of Gothic villainy; Byron's appropriation of Zeluco as an avatar of the broodingly Romantic Byronic hero makes that clear enough.
Hermitage Castle, a place of siege and counter siege, a witness to countless acts of barbarism, watched broodingly over the bloody events of the border valleys.
Seemingly self-sufficient amid the benevolent wild, he nevertheless gazes broodingly out of the frame: possibly pondering the sublime, but probably listening for the unseen creature the trap awaits.
Ruffalo is broodingly attractive with an unexpected glimmer of romance under the tough skin.
She opens the book with a chapter called "Afro-Saxon" and with a broodingly (and perhaps unintentionally) funny scene: on a family vacation, to Scotland at the age of eleven, she notices shopkeepers' raised eyebrows as she searches an Edinburgh shop for the McKinley tartan.
Along the landing she explores what had evidently been her mother's bedroom, with its medicines, crucifix and photos (at which Isabel looks broodingly) of men we take to be dead family-members; then goes along to her uncle who is still in bed, looking affable and quite unlike the threatening figure she had a brief vision of on the train.