mother cell

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moth·er cell

a cell which, by division, gives rise to two or more daughter cells.

mother cell

n.
A cell that divides to produce two or more daughter cells. Also called parent cell.

moth·er cell

(mŏth'ĕr sel)
A cell that, by division, gives rise to two or more daughter cells.
Synonym(s): metrocyte.
References in periodicals archive ?
This correlation was also used to examine the relationship between the total length of the cavity of utilized nests and the number of cells that were constructed (brood cells and vestibular cells).
In this regard, tangible information on the natural nest characteristics like the optimum nest volume, worker brood cell dimensions and bee space of A.
Table 1 reports the total amount of larval food and pollen (both in milligrams) per brood cell for each species.
The exact mechanism behind this intriguing trait remained unclear, but the researchers figured that a young SMR bee whose brood cell was infested with a female mite was somehow interrupting her attempts to reproduce--possibly through chemical cues.
Lastly, our results showed that vestibular cell length was not long enough to construct an additional brood cell, which supports the hypothesis of VC being a completion structure (Asis et al.
Honey bees sometimes engage in activities that fend off mites, including hygienic behavior, where bees uncap and purge the contents of diseased brood cells. Some exhibit grooming behaviors, such as adult bees biting mites from their bodies or from the bodies of other bees.
`We know the signal is produced in a 72-hour period, just before the brood cells of the honeybee larvae are sealed and the larvae begin to pupate,' Anderson says.
After closing the last brood cell, the female begins collecting material (the same as that for cell partitions) to construct a nest plug.
In some nests, immatures from the first layer of brood cells (always in contact with the substrate) were exposed, in which case the immatures were collected and placed in labeled individual vials and identified.
The active nest had 12 pedicels, 600 brood cells, and 15 adult wasps.
It details the diversity of bees there; research on bee lifecycles, nesting behavior, and sexual lives; the solitary bees that have adopted cleptoparasitic modes of life by laying their eggs in the brood cells of other species; their mutual adaptations with the flowers they pollinate; and approaches to research that can be undertaken by amateurs.