bronchus


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Related to bronchus: tracheal bronchus

bronchus

 [brong´kus] (pl. bron´chi)
any of the larger passages conveying air to a lung (right or left principal bronchus) and within the lungs (lobar and segmental bronchi). See also respiration and see color plates.

bron·chus

, pl.

bron·chi

(brong'kŭs, brong'kī), [TA]
One of two subdivisions of the trachea serving to convey air to and from the lungs. The trachea divides into right and left main bronchi, which in turn form lobar, segmental, and intrasegmental bronchi. Structurally, the intrapulmonary (secondary) bronchi have a lining of pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium and a lamina propria with abundant longitudinal networks of elastic fibers; there are spirally arranged bundles of smooth muscle, abundant mucoserous glands, and, in the outer part of the wall, irregular plates of hyaline cartilage.
[Mod. L., fr. G. bronchos, windpipe]

bronchus

(brŏng′kəs)
n. pl. bron·chi (-kī′, -kē′)
Either of two main branches of the trachea, leading directly to the lungs.

bronchus

Any of the large airways of the lungs, beginning at the tracheal bifurcation, which gives rise to the the right and left mainstem (primary) bronchi; these divide into three lobar (secondary) bronchi in the right lung and two in the left, which then divide into segmental (tertiary) bronchi. The airway divisions after segmental bronchi are termed bronchioles. Bronchi have an outer fibrous layer with irregularly placed plates of hyaline cartilage, an interlacing network of smooth muscle and a mucous membrane lined by ciliated columnar epithelial cells and scattered mucus cells.

bron·chus

, pl. bronchi (brong'kŭs, -kī)
One of the two subdivisions of the trachea serving to convey air to and from the lungs. The trachea divides into right and left main bronchi, which in turn form lobar, segmental, and subsegmental bronchi. The intrapulmonary bronchi have a lining of pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium and a lamina propria with abundant longitudinal networks of elastic fibers; there are spirally arranged bundles of smooth muscle, abundant mucoserous glands, and, in the outer part of the wall, irregular plates of hyaline cartilage.
[Mod. L., fr. G. bronchos, windpipe]
Enlarge picture
BRONCHEAL TREE

bronchus

(brong'kus) (brong'ki?, brong'ke?) plural.bronchi [Gr. bronchos, windpipe]
One of the two large branches of the trachea. The trachea divides opposite the third thoracic vertebra into the right and left main bronchi. The point of division, called the carina trachea, is the site where foreign bodies too large to enter either bronchus would rest after passing through the trachea. The right bronchus is shorter and more vertical than the left one. After entering the lung each bronchus divides further and terminates in bronchioles.

bronchus suis

Tracheal bronchus.

tracheal bronchus

An accessory bronchus that branches off directly from the trachea, the carina, or another bronchus. It is an ectopic malformation of the respiratory tract that usually runs to the right upper lobe of the lung. Synonym: bronchus suis
See: illustration; bronchi

bronchus

A breathing tube. A branch of the windpipe (TRACHEA) or of another bronchus. The trachea divides into two main bronchi, one for each lung, and these, in turn, divide into further, smaller bronchi. See also BRONCHIOLES.

bronchus

one of a pair of tubes (bronchii)

linking the trachea to the lungs in mammals. Each bronchus consists mainly of connective tissue and a small amount of smooth muscle, the tubes becoming finely divided into bronchioles within the lungs, forming a ‘bronchial tree’. See BREATHING and Fig. 81 .

Bronchus

One of the two large tubes connecting the windpipe and the lungs.
Mentioned in: Lung Abscess

bron·chus

, pl. bronchi (brong'kŭs, -kī)
One of two subdivisions of the trachea serving to convey air to and from the lungs.
[Mod. L., fr. G. bronchos, windpipe]
References in periodicals archive ?
The culprit vascular often surrounds the bronchus and runs within the bronchial submucosa.
Ghrelin-ip cells were located among the tertiary bronchus mucosal epithelial cells, respiratory capillary epithelial cells and macrophages, and they tended to be restricted to a single cell with different sizes (Fig.
A TEP lodged in the right mainstem bronchus was removed with biopsy forceps via the endoscope channel (Figure 4).
Pearson, "Mucous plug in the bronchus causing lung collapse," The New England Journal of Medicine, vol.
The mass is in the middle mediastinum, at the level of the carina and adjacent to the trachea extending to the subcarinal region, causing compression on the carina and both main bronchi, more pronounced on the left main bronchus.
Caption: Figure 2: Bronchoscopic images ((a) and (b)) depicting an obstructed LLL bronchus with a fleshy, pearly endobronchial mass (black arrow).
The lobar location of the nodule, the bronchus sign, the nodule size, the malignant vs.
We collected 1.0 cm-long fragments of the cranial and caudal portions of the trachea, tracheal bronchus, main bronchi and lungs, washed in distilled water for 20 min and post-fixed in 1 % osmium tetroxide solution (Polyscience[R], Inc.
Throat/Oesophagus Coin 50 72 Battery 16 Chicken Bone 03 None 03 Ear Eraser 08 28 Pea 08 Pebble 04 Remote Button 02 Maize Seed 02 Peanut 02 None 02 Nose Button 03 08 Peanut 03 Watch Cell 02 Bronchus Bits of Almond 03 08 Bits of Berry 03 Small Plastic 01 Whistle Peanut 01 Fig.
MEC generally occurs in the central bronchial region.[5] In our patient, the tumor was arising from the right upper lobe bronchus. The common clinical symptoms and signs include cough, hemoptysis, bronchitis, wheezing, fever, chest pain, and rarely clubbing of the fingers.[7] Similarly, our presented case had complaints of cough and dyspnea.
TBA mainly affects the trachea, main bronchus, lobar bronchi, and segmental bronchi, while it has little impact on small airways and alveoli.
Previous studies in Ghana had shown that fishbone, groundnuts, seeds, plastic materials, and metallic materials were the most commonly aspirated foreign bodies with a majority of them localized to the right main bronchus [4, 10, 11].