bronchoscope

(redirected from bronchoscopist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to bronchoscopist: bronchoscopies

bronchoscope

 [brong´ko-skōp]
an endoscope especially designed for passage through the trachea to permit inspection of the interior of the tracheobronchial tree and carrying out of endobronchial diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers, such as taking specimens for culture and biopsy and removing foreign bodies. adj., adj bronchoscop´ic.
fiberoptic bronchoscope bronchofiberscope.

bron·cho·scope

(brong'kō-skōp),
An endoscope for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree, either for diagnostic purposes (including biopsy) or for the removal of foreign bodies. There are two types: flexible and rigid.
Synonym(s): bronchofiberscope
[broncho- + G. skopeō, to view]

bronchoscope

(brŏng′kə-skōp′)
n.
A slender tubular instrument with a small light on the end for inspection of the interior of the bronchi.

bron′cho·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
bron·chos′co·pist (brŏn-kŏs′kə-pĭst, brŏng-) n.
bron·chos′co·py (-kə-pē) n.

bronchoscope

A thin, flexible, lighted endoscope used to examine the upper airways, vocal cords and tracheobronchial tree to the 4th to 6th division, obtain diagnostic material (i.e., biopsies, brushings, washings), and instil medicine and mechanics for easy guidance through the tree. Bronchoscopes may have a halogen or xenon light source, a 2–2.5 mm channel.

bronchoscope

Pulmonology A thin, flexible, lighted endoscope used to examine the upper airways, vocal cords, and tracheobronchial tree to the 4th to 6th division, obtain diagnostic material, ie biopsies, brushings, washings, and instill medicine, and mechanics for easy guidance through the tree. See Bronchoscopy.

bron·cho·scope

(brong'kō-skōp)
An endoscope for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree.
[broncho- + G. skopeō, to view]

Bronchoscope

A lighted, flexible tube inserted into the windpipe to view the bronchi or withdraw fluid samples for testing. Bronchoscopy with a protected brush can be used in the diagnosis of lung abscess in severely ill patients.

bron·cho·scope

(brong'kō-skōp)
An endoscope for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree.
[broncho- + G. skopeō, to view]
References in periodicals archive ?
The skills seem to be still improving in experienced bronchoscopists even after 300 cases.
The 10-point VAS scores for comfort as recorded by the bronchoscopist and patients showed no difference between the groups.
Rigid bronchoscopy allows bronchoscopists to perform local tamponade of the bleeding if the source is central and to use a wide variety of endoscopic techniques.
Bronchoscopist, afterwards performed the endo-bronchial examination via tracheostomy tube to reassure the desired position of the tracheostomy tube in the trachea, to estimate the distance of the tracheostomy tube tip from the carina, and to reassure the patency of distal airways.
The authors would like to thank nurses, physiotherapists and doctors of intensive care unit of the Liver Transplant and Surgery Clinic and bronchoscopists for outstanding assistance.
Despite the work done by Magill and Rowbotham, there remained a difference of opinion amongst anaesthetists and bronchoscopists regarding the optimal positioning for laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation.
The decision to perform a cryobiopsy or a conventional biopsy was at the operator's discretion, which was largely based on experience and comfort level of the performing bronchoscopist. If there was a risk for bleeding (ie, coagulopathy), conventional biopsy would have likely been preferred.
A cytopathologist was present on site during the endobronchial ultrasound-guided FNA procedure of a 4L lymph node, during which 13 needle passes were obtained by the bronchoscopist. For each of the first 9 passes, a pair of smears was prepared: 1 air-dried smear and 1 alcohol-fixed smear.
The preliminary diagnosis of malignancy with a differential diagnosis of metastatic melanoma versus metastatic adenocarcinoma was communicated to the bronchoscopist, and EBUS-guided FNA procedure was concluded; the paratracheal lymph node was not sampled.
In such cases, accurate determination of distance of tumor from the carina requires integration of clinicoradiographic data and/or consultation with the surgeon, radiologist, and/or bronchoscopist. When this information is not available, particularly as may occur in the setting of external consultation, it is permissible to indicate this staging parameter is not assessable.