bronchoscope

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bronchoscope

 [brong´ko-skōp]
an endoscope especially designed for passage through the trachea to permit inspection of the interior of the tracheobronchial tree and carrying out of endobronchial diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers, such as taking specimens for culture and biopsy and removing foreign bodies. adj., adj bronchoscop´ic.
fiberoptic bronchoscope bronchofiberscope.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bron·cho·scope

(brong'kō-skōp),
An endoscope for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree, either for diagnostic purposes (including biopsy) or for the removal of foreign bodies. There are two types: flexible and rigid.
Synonym(s): bronchofiberscope
[broncho- + G. skopeō, to view]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bronchoscope

(brŏng′kə-skōp′)
n.
A slender tubular instrument with a small light on the end for inspection of the interior of the bronchi.

bron′cho·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
bron·chos′co·pist (brŏn-kŏs′kə-pĭst, brŏng-) n.
bron·chos′co·py (-kə-pē) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bronchoscope

A thin, flexible, lighted endoscope used to examine the upper airways, vocal cords and tracheobronchial tree to the 4th to 6th division, obtain diagnostic material (i.e., biopsies, brushings, washings), and instil medicine and mechanics for easy guidance through the tree. Bronchoscopes may have a halogen or xenon light source, a 2–2.5 mm channel.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bronchoscope

Pulmonology A thin, flexible, lighted endoscope used to examine the upper airways, vocal cords, and tracheobronchial tree to the 4th to 6th division, obtain diagnostic material, ie biopsies, brushings, washings, and instill medicine, and mechanics for easy guidance through the tree. See Bronchoscopy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bron·cho·scope

(brong'kō-skōp)
An endoscope for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree.
[broncho- + G. skopeō, to view]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Bronchoscope

A lighted, flexible tube inserted into the windpipe to view the bronchi or withdraw fluid samples for testing. Bronchoscopy with a protected brush can be used in the diagnosis of lung abscess in severely ill patients.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bron·cho·scope

(brong'kō-skōp)
An endoscope for inspecting the interior of the tracheobronchial tree.
[broncho- + G. skopeō, to view]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Bronchoscopic features and bronchoscopic intervention for endobronchial hamartoma.
The yield with bronchoscopic biopsy is better than bronchial brushings and bronchoscopic washings in the diagnosis of malignancy presenting with collapse of lung.
More than 200 diagnostic and therapeutic bronchoscopic procedures were conducted during this time frame and 50 patients required TBLB in isolation or in addition to other bronchoscopic procedures which included bronchial washings, BAL, transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) and endobronchial biopsies.
Pulmonary bleeding is a life-threatening complication resulting from pulmonary diseases or following bronchoscopic therapies and biopsy taking.
Caption: FIGURE 4B: Bronchoscopic view of the broncholith as it is attached to the end of the scope via suction as it passes through the nasopharynx on its way out.
Hoffman, "Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction using tissue engineering principles," American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol.
Second, the study was retrospective, and the inclusion of patients receiving bronchoscopic cryobiopsy might be highly selective.
Before the advent of bronchoscopic techniques, the mortality rate for airway FBs was unacceptably high at around 50% [28].
Previous studies have demonstrated that high-frequency wire snares are useful devices for bronchoscopic electrocautery [3, 4].
Data collected included age, gender, disease duration, clinical manifestations, presence or absence of misdiagnosis, imaging manifestations, bronchoscopic manifestations, pathology, treatments, and prognosis.
Bronchoscopic thermal vapour ablation (InterVapor; Uptake Medical, USA) uses high-temperature water vapour delivered into the target lung segments through a catheter with precise amount of energy, thereby inducing thermal damage resulting in permanent airway fibrosis.
This approach was taken to avoid the introduction of nasal and oral material during the bronchoscopic examination.