bronchopulmonary sequestration

bron·cho·pul·mo·nar·y se·ques·tra·tion

a congenital anomaly in which a mass of lung tissue becomes isolated, during development, from the rest of the lung; the bronchi in the mass are usually dilated or cystic and are not connected with the bronchial tree; it is supplied by a branch of the aorta.

bronchopulmonary sequestration

A rare congenital condition related to developmental defects of the embryonic foregut, in which nonfunctioning lung tissue is detached from the normal lung and does not communicate with the bronchopulmonary tree. Sequestered lung tissue is supplied by an anomalous systemic artery—usually arising from the aorta or a tributary—and contains normal elements in a disorderly array with variable amounts of cartilage, alveolar parenchyma and bronchial glands, the secretion from which leads to the formation of fluid-filled cysts. Communication with functional pulmonary tissue explains the common bacterial infections (although there is considerable overlap in the types).

Bronchopulmonary sequestration
Intralobar—85% of cases, bilateral, often supplied by a branch of the thoracic aorta.
Extralobar—More common in men, linked to other congenital defects, may communicate with the foregut; 90% are left sided.

bron·cho·pul·mo·nar·y se·ques·tra·tion

(brong'kō-pul'mŏ-nār-ē sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
A congenital anomaly in which a mass of lung tissue becomes isolated during development from the rest of the lung; the bronchi in the mass are usually dilated or cystic and are not connected with the bronchial tree; it is supplied by a branch of the aorta.
References in periodicals archive ?
[7] CECT establishes degree of lung hypoplasia and the anomalous vein with other associated anomalies and differentiates it from atelectasis, bronchopulmonary sequestration and true dextrocardia, [8,9] MDCT with 3D reconstruction will detect the entire course of Scimitar vein and its eventual drainage site.
Bronchopulmonary sequestration is one of the rare thoracic congenital anomalies.
Keywords: Bronchopulmonary sequestration, Children, Intralobar, Extralobar, Recurrent pneumonia.
The changes were consistent with pulmonary hypertension, with extensive hemorrhagic infarction confirming the diagnosis of bronchopulmonary sequestration with anomalous arterial supply.
The two types of bronchopulmonary sequestration are intralobar (ILS), as in our patients, and extralobar sequestration (ELS).
Bronchopulmonary sequestration: radiologic findings.
Bronchopulmonary sequestration includes a spectrum of abnormalities.
In the fetus, polidocanol has been used for fetal intralobar bronchopulmonary sequestration and for congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung.
Pathologic Diagnosis: Intralobar Bronchopulmonary Sequestration
A bronchopulmonary sequestration represents an abnormal, nonfunctioning mass of lung tissue that lacks a connection to the tracheobronchial tree and that is supplied by a systemic artery.
For the purpose of this review, we will focus on the most commonly encountered lesions in our practice, which include cystic adenomatoid malformation, bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS), and bronchial atresia (BA).
Under this umbrella, the most commonly described congenital chest lesions are congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM), bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), bronchogenic cysts, and congenital lobar overinflation (CLO).