bronchiole


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bronchiole

 [brong´ke-ōl]
one of the successively smaller channels into which the segmental bronchi divide within the bronchopulmonary segments. adj., adj bronchi´olar.
respiratory b's the final branches of the bronchioles, communicating directly with the alveolar ducts; they are subdivisions of terminal bronchioles, have alveolar outcroppings, and themselves divide into several alveolar ducts.
Respiratory bronchiole. From Dorland's 2000.
( and see color plates.)
terminal bronchiole the last portion of a bronchiole that does not contain alveoli, i.e., one whose sole function is gas conduction; it subdivides into respiratory bronchioles.

bron·chi·ole

(brong'kē-ōl), [TA]
One of approximately six generations of increasingly finer subdivisions of the bronchi, all smaller than 1 mm in diameter, and having no cartilage in its wall, but relatively abundant smooth muscle and elastic fibers.
Synonym(s): bronchiolus [TA]

bronchiole

/bron·chi·ole/ (brong´ke-ōl) one of the finer subdivisions of the branched bronchial tree.
respiratory bronchioles  the final branches of the bronchioles.

bronchiole

(brŏng′kē-ōl′)
n.
Any of the fine, thin-walled, tubular extensions of a bronchus.

bron′chi·o′lar (-ō′lər) adj.

bronchiole

[brong′kē·ōl]
Etymology: L, bronchiolus, little windpipe
a small airway of the respiratory system extending from the bronchi into the lobes of the lung. There are two divisions of bronchioles: The terminal bronchioles passively conduct inspired air from the bronchi to the respiratory bronchioles and expired air from the respiratory bronchioles to the bronchi. The respiratory bronchioles function similarly, allowing the exchange of air and waste gases between the alveolar ducts and the terminal bronchioles. bronchiolar [brongkē′ələr] adj.
enlarge picture
Bronchioles

bronchiole

A conducting airway which begins at the last cartilaginous plate and ends at the last ciliated epithelial cell; bronchioli are any of 7–9 increasingly finer subdivisions of the bronchiolar tree (BT), measuring < 1 mm in diameter. In the distal BT, the respiratory epithelium becomes flatter, the ciliated cells fewer in number, the mucous glands less prominent and eventually disappear and, in the purely respiratory bronchioles, cuboidal nonciliated non-mucus-producing Clara cells appear.

Bronchiole types 
Respiratory bronchiole bronchiolus respiratorius MNA6
Any of 1–3 generations of ≤ 0.5-mm airways that connect terminal bronchioli to the alveolar ducts. Alveoli arise directly from the wall of RBs; the most distal RB is histologically characterised by an air space lined on one side by respiraotory epithelium and on the other by alveoli.
 
Terminal bronchiole bronchiolus terminalis NA6
Any of ±6 generations of purely conducting—i.e., nonrespiratory bronchioles—which connect; rare direct connections between TBs and alveoli may be seen, known as Lamberth’s canals.

bron·chi·ole

(brong'kē-ōl)
One of approximately six generations of increasingly finer subdivisions of the bronchi, each smaller than 1 mm in diameter, and having no cartilage in its wall, but relatively abundant smooth muscle and elastic fibers.
Synonym(s): bronchiolus [TA] .

bronchiole

One of the many thin-walled, tubular branches of the bronchi, which extend the airway to the terminal air sacs (alveoli). Bronchi have cartilaginous rings, bronchioles do not.

bronchiole

one of the smaller tubes branching off the two main bronchii in the lungs of higher vertebrates. See BREATHING and Fig. 81 .

Bronchiole

A thin air passage in the lung that branches off a larger airway.
Mentioned in: Bronchiolitis

bronchiole

subdivision of a bronchus

bron·chi·ole

(brong'kē-ōl)
One of approximately six generations of increasingly finer subdivisions of the bronchi, all smaller than 1 mm in diameter.

bronchiole (brong´kēōl),

n a terminal division of a bronchium.

bronchiole

one of the successively smaller channels (1 mm or less) into which the bronchi divide.

respiratory bronchiole
the final branch of a bronchiole, communicating directly with the alveolar ducts; a subdivision of a terminal bronchiole, it has alveolar outcroppings and itself divides into several alveolar ducts.
References in periodicals archive ?
And, finally, there were increased collagen fibres due to hyperproliferation of fibroblasts in addition to mononuclear cell infiltration around the terminal bronchioles (Figure-10).
Cromolyn stabilizes bronchiole mast cells and inhibits release of inflammatory mediators.
In asthma, reversible airway obstruction is caused by inflammation, contraction of the airway smooth muscle, increased mucus secretion, and plugging of the bronchioles.
Previously, when I worked at Baylor College of Medicine, we used transwells to study human bronchial epithelial cells," said n3D scientist Jacob Gage, who co-authored the bronchiole study.
If there are emphysematous changes in the lung involving the loss of elastic and reticular fibers from the release of excess trypsin from macrophages keyed by the response to particulate deposition, as in a smoker's lung, the bronchioles will not remain patent as the lung volume approaches residual volume (RV) and as the trans-pulmonary pressures increase.
A new understanding of the inflammation process confirms that in asthma the bronchioles sustain acute and long-term pathologic changes.
Membranous bronchiole characterized by multiple small granulomata in the airway wall in a patient with Crohn colitis (hematoxylineosin, original magnification X80).
This breathing problem occurs when smooth muscle fibers surrounding the lungs' bronchioles contract, and bronchiole linings become inflamed and swollen.
Cryobiopsies are reported to yield significantly larger specimens with more alveoli, bronchioles, veins, and venules, and less procedure-related artifact when compared to traditional forceps transbronchial biopsies (Figure 1, A and B).
8) Smokers' bronchiolitis, or respiratory bronchiolitis, is recognized pathologically as an increase of macrophages, which contain a finely granular golden brown pigment, present within the lumen of the respiratory bronchiole and subtending alveolar spaces (Figure 5).
B and C, Cross-section through bronchiole of collapsed lung resected for lung cancer, showing ex vivo smooth muscle contraction with folding of respiratory epithelium and underlying basement membrane and focal ex vivo aggregation of the elastin.
Recent studies have shown that whereas epithelial cells in the human respiratory tract express predominantly the [alpha]-2,6 sialic acid receptor, cells expressing the [alpha]-2,3 receptor were detected only occasionally in the upper respiratory tract; however, measurable expression of [alpha]-2,3-linked sialic acid receptors was found in some cells in the alveolar epithelium and at the junction of alveolus and terminal bronchiole (35).